2017 #KDPgrad with Pride Photo Contest – Now Open!

KDPgrad

Are you a senior or grad student who is graduating this spring or graduated in December?

First of all, congratulations! We are proud of you and wish you the very best as you job search and start your teaching career.

We know you must be proud of yourself and your achievements, too—and took (or will take) photos of yourself in your cap and gown with your KDP cords, stole, and/or medallion.

Share one or two of your favorite pictures of yourself on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #KDPGrad as a first step to entering our annual KDP Graduate with Pride photo contest.

To complete your entry, go to http://www.kdp.org/gradwithpridecontest.php to answer a quick survey so we know who you are and a couple of sentences about your journey to become a teacher.

All completed entries will be entered into a drawing to win 1 of 5 $20 gift certificates to the KDP Store.

Pictures will be placed in an album on KDP’s Facebook page. One way to win is to share the photo(s) from our page and/or ask your friends and family members to “like” your photo for a chance to win the most “likes.”

Eligible participants are members who graduated in December 2016 or are graduating this spring semester. The contest deadline is June 16, after which winners will be selected.

Good luck! We’ll be looking for your picture soon!

2016 Winners of the #KDPGrad Photo Contest

Becoming a Food Allergy–Aware School Community

Food allergies in schools have become an increasingly serious concern for students, teachers, and school personnel.

As an educator, you likely didn’t plan on providing medical care for students, but the reality is that almost half of severe allergic reactions, called anaphylaxis, that happen at school occur in the classroom on your watch (Hogue, 2017).

It isn’t enough to just have a plan for students in your class that are known to have an allergy because one out of every four food allergy reactions that happen at school happen to students with no known history of a food allergy (McIntyre et al., 2005; Sicherer et al., 2001). While rare, students have died from the effects of suffering an allergic reaction and not receiving the life-saving medication called epinephrine soon enough (Schoessler & White, 2013; Robinson & Ficca, 2011; Sicherer & Simons, 2007).

What can you do to prepare for the possibility of a food allergy reaction happening in your class? You can become allergy-aware by learning the signs and symptoms of a reaction, responding to a potential allergic reaction, and preventing allergic reactions from happening.

Signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction

The early symptoms may be mild but can quickly become life threatening. The following chart from the Epinephrine Policies and Protocols Workgroup of the National Association of School Nurses (2014) provides guidance for educators.

Are any of these signs and symptoms present and severe? Or is there a COMBINATION of symptoms from different body areas?
LUNG: Short of breath, wheeze, repetitive cough SKIN: Hives, itchy rashes, swelling (eyes, lips)
HEART: Pale, blue, faint, weak pulse, dizzy, confused GUT: Vomiting, cramping pain, diarrhea
THROAT: Tight, hoarse, trouble breathing/swallowing HEENT*: Runny nose, sneezing, swollen eyes, phlegmy throat
MOUTH:  Obstructive swelling (tongue and/or lips) OTHER: Confusion, agitation, feeling of imp

ending doom

SKIN: Hives all over body [OR Hives visible on body] If YES, quickly follow the student’s emergency action plan or your school’s policies and procedures.

*Head, eyes, ears, nose, and throat.

How to respond to an allergic reaction

Once it is clear that an allergic reaction may be occurring (or even if you think, “I wonder if this might be an allergic reaction.”), take action quickly.

For a student with a known allergy, refer to the student’s emergency action plan. For a student with no known allergy, contact the school nurse if your school has one and take action according to your school’s policies and procedures.

Students experiencing anaphylaxis need emergency epinephrine. Every state and every school district has different rules and regulations about which school personnel can administer this life-saving medication. If you are not allowed to use an epinephrine auto-injector, get someone who can quickly.

If you are allowed to use an epinephrine auto-injector, take heart because epinephrine auto-injectors are very easy to use. Demonstration videos are available online:

If an epinephrine auto-injection is required, immediately dial 911 or call your emergency services. Contact your school nurse if he or she is not already on the scene, as well as a parent or guardian.

Preventing food allergy reactions

No plan is fool-proof. Even the most meticulous person cannot avoid all potential exposures to allergens, especially food allergens. However, some simple steps can decrease the likelihood of a student’s exposure to his or her allergen.

: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6292635169625597441

About the Author
Andrea Tanner, MSN, RN, NCSN, is a National Association of School Nurses (NASN) Epinephrine Resource School Nurse, Anaphylaxis Community Expert, National Certified School Nurse, selected as one of the 2015 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing, and Coordinator of Health Services in southern Indiana. Mrs. Tanner served on a committee with the American Academy of Pediatrics to develop national guidance for school allergy policies and procedures. She has presented on food allergy policies, procedures, and staff training at state and national conferences, and has published articles on the topic in Principal Leadership and NASN School Nurse.

References

Epinephrine Policies and Protocols Workgroup of the National Association of School Nurses. (2014). Sample protocol for treatment of symptoms of anaphylaxis – Epinephrine autoinjector administration by school health professionals and trained personnel. Retrieved from https://www.nasn.org/portals/0/resources/Sample_Anaphylaxis_Epinephrine_Administration_Protocol.pdf

Hogue, S, et al. Abstract 696. Presented at: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting; March 3-6, 2017; Atlanta.

McIntyre, C., Sheetz, A., Carroll, C., & Young, M. (2005). Administration of epinephrine for life-threatening allergic reactions in school settings. Pediatrics, 116(5), 1134-1140.

Robinson, J. & Ficca, M. (2011).  Managing the student with severe food allergies.  Journal of School Nursing, 28(3), 187-194.  doi: 10.1177/1059840511429686.

Schoessler, S. & White, M.  (2013) Recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis in the school setting:  The essential role of the school nurse.  NASN School Nurse, 29: 407-415.  doi:  10.1177/1059840513506014

Sicherer, S., Furlong, T., DeSimone, J., & Sampson, H. (2001). The US Peanut and Tree Nut Allergy Registry: Characteristics of reactions in schools and day care. Journal of Pediatrics, 138(4), 560-565.

Sicherer, S. & Simons, F.E. (2007).  Self-injectable epinephrine for first aid management of anaphylaxis.  Pediatrics, 119(3), 638-646.  doi: 10.1542/peds.2006-3689.

Voices for Change

Last week I had the privilege of witnessing a culture of peace.

There was a message delivered with urgency for global education at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. The meeting was called “Conversation with UN Secretary-General António Guterres, Malala Yousafzai and Young People about Girls’ Education.”

Yousafzai, who was appointed as the youngest UN Messenger of Peace, emphasized that education is a basic right that every child should have.

She believes that the youth are changemakers and therefore should believe in themselves.

Guterres agreed with Yousafzai that the voices of girls are important and should be heard. When asked what advice she would give to her younger self, she simply stated, “Believe in yourself. Believe in your ideas.”

As a woman and educator, I see the need for girls to build confidence in their abilities and skills as students and community members.” This is where we, as teachers, must step in and solidify the connection between education and opportunity. Guterres reminded us all to carry into the future the same passion for learning that we have now.

He continued on to say, “So many of us are afraid to speak up.”

We have the job of helping the youth build a voice.

There are instances when girls mute their thoughts because they are too intimidated to stand out.

However, now is the time to transform those thoughts into words and give them life through speech.

Join the movement for change.

“I decided to speak up.” -Malala Yousafzai

Happy Teaching,
Clairetza Felix

Clairetza Felix is a senior at St. Francis College, with a major in Childhood Education and a concentration in English. Currently, she serves as the Co-Event Coordinator for the Xi Rho Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi. As an aspiring Literacy Specialist, she chose to become a UN Youth Representative to offer a unique approach to education.

Tell Congress to Fund Education Leadership!

This spring, Congress will be making critical decisions about President Trump’s budget request to cut education spending by 13%.

The School Leader Recruitment and Support Program (SLRSP), the only federal program that specifically focuses on strengthening leadership in our high-need schools, is at risk.

With the emphasis on increasing student achievement, turning around failing schools, and producing college and career-ready graduates, successful school leaders are especially important.

Education leadership and leadership development, including teacher leaders and building/district leaders, have been part of Kappa Delta Pi for more than 105 years. While teacher leadership plays a critical role in improving student learning outcomes and enhancing the professional growth of teachers, schools also must have quality principal leadership.

According to the National Association of Secondary School Principals, principal leadership is second only to classroom instruction among all school-related factors that contribute to what students learn at school. Even more significant is the finding that quality principal leadership is particularly important to high-poverty schools.

The issue of quality school leadership connects with KDP’s mission in other critical ways too.

KDP has a rich legacy of working to support and retain thousands of talented new teachers who enter classrooms every year, especially those teaching in high-poverty urban and rural schools. Any teacher retention effort must include effective school leaders, because leadership is among the most important factors in a teacher’s decision to stay in a school or in the profession.

Studies have shown that improvements in school leadership were strongly related to reductions in teacher turnover. While teacher attrition has always had negative consequences on student academic achievement, school finances, and school culture, it is particularly problematic given the increasing teacher shortages across the country.

As part of an organization committed to equity and quality education for ALL students, we must advocate for adequate education funding, including the School Leadership Recruitment and Support Program for high-needs schools.

To that end, KDP, together with 29 other organizations, signed onto a joint letter.

As professionals, we can use our voices to educate members of Congress about the importance of education funding overall as well as for critical programs such as SLRSP. You, too, can sign the letter by following the link above.

We must remember: Teachers change the future!

Every Student Succeeds Act: Early Childhood Education

This is part of a series of blog posts by the KDP Public Policy Committee that examine the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA), a law that outlines the federal government’s role in education. The purpose of the series is to educate KDP members about this important law and its impact on their work as educators.

The ESSA Act requires documentation of “the strategies that the school will be implementing to address school needs, including a description of how such strategies will . . . address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of those at risk of not meeting the challenging State academic standards, through activities which may include . . . strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs” (pp. 68–69).

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” –Benjamin Franklin

The Every Student Succeeds Act reaffirms the country’s commitment to young learners. Although some research indicates that the kindergarten readiness achievement gap is lessening between children from low- and high-income families, the importance of preparing preschoolers for kindergarten remains a top priority for teachers and parents across the nation. ESSA acknowledges the need for high-quality preschool programs, outlines funding allotments and guidelines, and highlights the benefit of a smooth transition for preschoolers into kindergarten. Read more about the Early Learning Initiatives here.

According to ESSA Section 1114, if Title I funds are used to support preschool programs, then the school district plans must include a description of how the funding is used, specifically addressing how the district supports the transition from preschool to kindergarten. Also, the preschool program and/or services must comply with the performance standards laid out in the Head Start Act.

Vertical Alignment and Collaboration

Vertical alignment is an idea that most educators are familiar with: First-grade teachers share expectations with kindergarten teachers, second-grade teachers discuss what students should know by August with first-grade teachers, and so on. ESSA requires communication and collaboration between preschool programs and the school district. The focus on improving kindergarten readiness and supporting the preschool to kindergarten transition is a key point of the legislation. The idea is multi-faceted and holds many potential benefits, including:

  • Identifying and minimizing gaps in student learning by increasing communication between preschool and kindergarten teachers.
  • Increasing parent involvement and advocacy for their child by helping them to understand the transition.
  • Supporting students’ academic, emotional, and social needs as they transition.

Kindergarten Transition

The transition into kindergarten can be a tough one for children, parents, and sometimes teachers. Students enter kindergarten with so many varied experiences—some have been in daycare and preschool their whole life, and some have never been separated from a parent or family member. Many enter with knowledge of the alphabet and numbers, but there are also children who have never had any instruction or exposure to academic subjects. Regardless of background experiences, even simply learning to line up and sit down when asked can be a struggle.

Here are some ways to support the transition for students into kindergarten:

  • Connect preschool families with free book programs (like Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Program or visit Reading Rockets for more options) to engage kids with books.
  • Set up transition meetings with the preschool and kindergarten teachers, and support staff like counselors and nurses, to answer questions and establish expectations for families.
  • Establish a way for student preschool records to precede the student, giving the kindergarten teacher a running start at knowing academic (and sometimes social) needs before the school year begins.
  • Provide training for preschool teachers, kindergarten teachers, and support personnel on social and emotional needs specific to this transition.
  • Arrange kindergarten “play dates” over the summer for incoming kindergarteners and families to meet teachers, administration, support staff, and other kindergarteners.
  • Partner with local businesses and foundations to put together summer learning kits with crayons, paper, books, and other school supplies for the incoming kindergarteners to use over the summer.
  • Write and distribute a Tips for Families packet with helpful hints for parents and family members as they support their child through this transition.

Call to Action

Join this week’s ESSA discussion on KDP Global about these questions:

  • What do you or your district staff do to support the preschool to kindergarten transition?
  • In your experience, what are other potential benefits of supporting this transition?

Resources

Bassok, D., Finch, J. E., Lee, R., Reardon, S. F., & Waldfogel, J. (2016). Socioeconomic gaps in early childhood experiences: 1998 to 2010. AERA Open, 2(3), 1–22.

Reardon, S. F., & Portilla, X. A. (2016). Recent trends in income, racial, and ethnic school readiness gaps at kindergarten entry. AERA Open, 2(3), 1–18.

Ridzi, F., Sylvia, M., Qiao, X., & Craig, J. (2017). The Imagination Library Program and kindergarten readiness: Evaluating the impact of monthly book distribution. Journal of Applied Social Science, 11(1), 11–24.

Dr. Caroline Courter, NBCT, is a Curriculum Specialist at Age of Learning, Inc. and an adjunct faculty member in the Watson College of Education at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She is a member of the Kappa Delta Pi Policy Committee.

 

Igniting My Passion for the Teaching Profession

During her senior year in high school, my daughter was in honors chemistry, and all she did was worksheets.

When she shared this with me, I was shocked and retorted, “But you’re in honors chemistry! All you do is worksheets? Really?” So I called the chemistry teacher, who informed me, “Yes, all we do is worksheets. You just don’t understand; you’re not a teacher!” Right then and there I said to myself, “No I am not, but I can fix that!”

So I decided to go back to college in 1992 after my only child graduated from high school.

I attended what was then Valencia Community College, graduating with honors in the spring of 1994. In the fall of 1994 I started at the University of Central Florida and was inducted into the Omicron Lambda Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi.

Becoming a member of KDP truly changed my life in ways I could never have imagined and has helped me to become a better person and a better educator.

My association with Dr. Marcella Kysilka, a former International President of KDP and the Omicron Lambda Chapter Counselor, continued to fuel and grow my knowledge of pedagogy and my passion for teaching. Upon graduating cum laude in 1996 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics education, I obtained my temporary teaching certificate. After interviewing at three different high schools in my area, I was called by all of them offering me a teaching position.

I could have taught at any of the three schools. Yet I thoughtfully chose to teach at the inner-city school. Believing in the mission of KDP and the vision “Quality Learning for All” drove me to do everything within my power to inspire and motivate my students and to help them to learn and grow as individuals.

I used dice to teach probability. Kids showed up to my class that had never come before because they wanted to learn about dice. That’s OK. They also learned about probability and working with percentages and fractions along the way.

My students were project engineers for a few days, having to create boomerangs from cardboard after examining various sample models. They determined the slopes of the flanges and then created and decorated their boomerangs, which I called “sloperangs.” The looks on their faces when we went outside and tried out their prototypes were priceless. The sloperangs really worked!

We made the rate × time = distance formula come to life by measuring off fixed distances in front of the school and running “speed traps”—timing the cars as they passed. Then we went back inside and did the calculations to determine how fast the cars were going in miles per hour.

Was it an easy group of students to teach? No.

Were the challenges with teaching these students small? No.

Was it worth it? YES!

I am grateful for the opportunity I had to be their teacher, and I am grateful for being part of KDP.

My membership in KDP inspired me then and continues to ignite my passion as an educator.

Please consider a gift to Kappa Delta Pi today to celebrate the 106th year since our founding on March 8, 1911. Gifts of $19.11 or more are being matched thanks to the generosity of our Former Presidents. Donate now.

Dr. Peggy Moch is a full professor at Valdosta State University where she teachers Mathematics courses and serves as the Alpha Beta Kappa Chapter Counselor.

Every Student Succeeds Act: Deeper Learning, Personalized Learning

This is part of a series of blog posts by the KDP Public Policy Committee that examine the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA), a law that outlines the federal government’s role in education. The purpose of the series is to educate KDP members about this important law and its impact on their work as educators.

This is the time of year when building principals begin determining their master schedules for the upcoming school year.

Jobs are posted, interviews are conducted, new teachers are hired, and teachers start to put plans in place for the next school year.

Teachers begin reflecting about what adjustments they want to make to set up for a new group of students.

Several days and hours will be spent rearranging classrooms, planning upcoming units, hanging posters and other inspirational items, and putting the final touches on beginning-of-the-school-year activities meant to build relationships and class culture.

Teachers are faced with the challenges of building relationships, teaching standards, and ensuring that the learning needs of each student are met.

Truly understanding the needs of each student is time consuming and requires sufficient and effective professional development opportunities for teachers to build their knowledge and skill set to address these needs.

ESSA and State Standards

ESSA requires states to have academic standards in reading, language arts, mathematics and science that “align with the entrance requirements for credit-bearing coursework in the state’s system of public higher education and with applicable state career and technical education standards.” In addition to these standards, states are required to continue standardized testing.

Teachers are faced with the challenge of teaching the higher-order thinking skills students need to meet the standards. Because each classroom and each school is different, getting to know students and their individual learning needs allows teachers to differentiate their content and lesson activities to help all student receive the education they need to meet or exceed standards. Ensuring each student has the tools needed to be college and career ready requires adequate assistance by teachers, school leaders, districts, and states.

ESSA and Deeper Learning

The energy at the beginning of the school year transforms as teachers start to know and understand their students. The excitement changes from initial anticipation activities to problem-solving tactics enlisting the collective power of teachers to predict, reform, and adjust their teaching practices to address the needs of students in their individual classrooms. The mindset of students also changes as they determine how the content is relevant to them and how they are going to meet the expectations their teachers have of them to be creative and think critically.

ESSA provides support for states and districts to promote deeper learning through several means, including personalized learning opportunities. Deeper learning consists of “the delivery of challenging academic standards to students in innovative ways that allow them to learn, and then apply what they have learned.”

One way to support deeper learning is through personalized learning, which “emphasizes (1) developing trusted and caring relationships between teachers and students; (2) connecting learning to the real world; (3) linking curriculum to students’ interests, strengths, and aspirations; (4) providing students individually targeted instruction, practice, and support where they are struggling; and (5) creating more flexible learning environments.”

The outcome of providing personalized learning to elevate deeper learning is building equity by preparing all students regardless of their race, gender, background, and socioeconomic status with the skills they need to be college and career ready by the time they graduate high school.

The support ESSA provides is through Title I and Title II funds. States can use up to 3% of their Title II funds to support building leaders and principals by “developing high quality professional development programs.” States can use up to 3% of their Title I funds for “direct student services” helping students receive personalized learning services advancing their coursework through a variety of means to prepare them to be college and career ready.

Call to Action

Join this week’s ESSA discussion on KDP Global about these questions:

  1. How are your schools and districts promoting deeper learning through innovative practices?
  2. In what ways can personalized learning opportunities help students grow as learners?

dr-john-helgesonDr. John Helgeson is a Secondary ELA Curriculum Specialist in the Northshore School District in Washington State. He is a member of KDP’s Public Policy Committee.