Proudly Announcing the 2017-2018 Award Winners

These awards honor individuals and chapters for their significant contributions to Kappa Delta Pi and the education world.

This year’s pool of winners include chapters with inventive and impactful programming, dedicated counselors and officers who are leaving an incredible legacy for their respective chapters, and chapters who serve their institutions well through their overall actions to support the education community both on and off campus. Thank you to all who applied for your thoughtful entries!

Winners will be recognized at Convo 2018 and throughout the KDP Chapter webpages, blogs, and chapter highlights.

Chapter Program Awards

The Program Awards recognize chapters for demonstrating excellence in one of six program areas: service, professional development, fundraising, membership, education for sustainability and communication.

Professional Development

Kean University — Professional Development Workshop: Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning with Practicing Educators
Lindenwood University —Teacher Tips
Mercyhurst University — Teaching and Learning Expo
Rowan University — Mindfulness in the Classroom
Seton Hall University — Praxis Prep!
Shepherd University — Literacy Leaders Conference
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Teacher Toolbox Tuesdays
University of Rhode Island — KDP Career Fair Spring 2018

Membership

Nova Southeastern University — Membership Initiation – Virtual Ceremony
Stevenson University — KDP Family
University of Nebraska at Kearney — DESIGNING THE FUTURE: Building & Growing Our Legacy

Community Service

Governors State University — Hashtag Lunchbag
Indiana Wesleyan University — Books: The Gift That Opens Minds
Middlesex County College— Hands of Hope Fall Harvest Festival
Rowan University — Annual Pajama Party
University of North Texas — Teach Denton Mentorship

Education for Sustainability

Seton Hall University — ELLs in the Mainstream: A Toolkit for Pre-Service Teachers
Governors State University — Education for Sustainability: A Political Action Event

Fundraising

Kean University – Yankee Candle Fundraiser
Liberty University — Concessions Nights
Stevenson University — 20th Anniversary Celebration Raffle Baskets
University of Rhode Island — URI School of Education T-Shirt Fundraiser

Communications

Purdue University Ft. Wayne — Communication Plan to Promote Rho Kappa Chapter
Shepherd University — Kappa Delta Pi – Delta Psi Facebook Page

Phoenix Award

The Phoenix Award recognizes those chapters that have taken significant action to improve their overall level of effectiveness in chapter management and programming.

Alpha Zeta Xi Chapter – Reinhardt University

Distinguished Chapter Officer Award

The Distinguished Chapter Officer Award honors current or immediate-past officers who set positive examples for their chapters by representing the ideals of Kappa Delta Pi.

Alexandra Schrunk, — Membership Chair, University of North Texas
Caitlyn Murphy — President, Kean University
Cassandra Marques-Leach — President, University of Rhode Island
Grace Kibe — President, University of Memphis
Hannah Gaston — President, Liberty University
Jessica Thompson — Treasurer, University of Central Florida
Miranda Rachel Spina — President, Camden County College
Paige Millirons — President, University of South Florida
Yasmeen Anis — President, Flagler College

Regional Chapter Counselor Award

The Chapter Counselors achieving this award are leaders who represent the mission and ideals of KDP and who have achieved excellence in the role of Counselor.

MidwestDr. Susan Beesley, Marian University, Indianapolis
NortheastLeana R. Malinowsky, Kean University
Southeast Dr. Sandra Trotman, Nova Southeastern University
WestDr. Jeanne Tunks & Dr. Ricardo Gonzalez-Carriedo, University of North Texas
Community College/OnlineMrs. Jennifer Souza, American Public University

Dr. Victoria Tusken Becomes KDP Executive Council President

(July 1, 2018, Indianapolis, IN) – Kappa Delta Pi (KDP) is proud to welcome the newly elected 2018–2020 Executive Council President. Dr. Victoria Tusken will lead the Executive Council in realizing the strategic goals of the Society and developing a vision for the organization’s next 3 to 5 years that allows it to be of maximum service to teachers and the teaching profession. The Executive Council will work in partnership with KDP Executive Director Faye Snodgress, as well as Snodgress’ successor.

“All of us, who have a role in education,” shared Tusken, “bear the responsibility to equip today’s students with the necessary skills to become participating citizens of an increasingly global 21st century. To that end, Kappa Delta Pi remains committed to supporting quality teacher preparation and programs, to retaining quality teachers in the classroom, and to advocating for equity and global sustainability for all.”

Effective now through June 2020, the KDP Executive Council includes the following leaders:

Victoria Tusken (DeKalb Community Unit School District #428), President

Elizabeth Elliott (Florida Gulf Coast University), President-Elect

Peggy Moch (Valdosta State University), Immediate Past-President

Rose Cardarelli (Eagle Development, LLC), Member

Peggy Marciniec (University of Wisconsin–Platteville), Member

Barbara B. Meyer (Illinois State University), Member

Shannon L. Rice (Jefferson Central School), Member

Suellen Reed (Indiana Department of Education, retired), Member

Christine Sleeter (California State University–Monterey Bay), Laureate Representative

David C. Berliner (Arizona State University), Advisory Member

Ali Jafari (CourseNetworking), Advisory Member

Tusken was first elected to the Executive Council in February 2014 to serve a 2-year term as the Professional Representative, a position that no longer exists on this leadership board. In February 2016, she was elected to the Executive Council to serve as the President-Elect for the 2018–2020 biennium.

To learn more about the leadership of Kappa Delta Pi, please visit our website at http://www.kdp.org/aboutkdp/index.php.

5 Perfect Summer Side Gigs for Teachers

Today’s blogger is Joyce Wilson, who has worked as a teacher for decades. She believes knowledge is the key to a more successful and fruitful life. 

When school lets out for the summer, teachers collectively exhale. For many, this two-month break means travel, getting back into hobbies, or catching up on favorite books, movies, or shows. But for others, that’s 10 weeks without a paycheck, which can be a bit nerve-wracking. As an educator, you have many skills and talents that you can put toward a side job to help supplement your income during those summer months.

Not sure where to start? If you want to earn extra income during the summer, this list might offer some perfect opportunities to work side gigs or even start your own business.

Sell Your Materials

As a teacher, you have amassed an enormous amount of materials, activities, and ideas that you can sell online to other educators. You could spend the summer getting your own business off the ground—building a website, recording a few videos, setting up e-commerce, and uploading your materials—so that this income can roll in year-round. A little time and effort now can generate passive income even when you resume teaching.

Give People a Lyft

An ideal summer job for teachers is one with flexible hours that they can wrap around any schedule they want. That’s what makes ridesharing services like Uber or Lyft great gigs; they let you set your own hours, use your own vehicle, and meet new people. If you want to work, you do; and if you feel like spending a few days enjoying your break, you don’t have to work. Many people can earn as much as $20 an hour driving for a rideshare, which requires minimal processing and training.

Work Online

From freelance writing to online tutoring, working online can be a great summer gig for educators, and there are lots of opportunities out there. ACT hires educators to be item writers who ensure that test questions reflect what is actually being taught in classrooms. The eNotes Educator program frequently hires educators as answer writers for their online homework help section. Some teachers report making nearly $40 per answer writing for eNotes. English teachers who enjoy the world of online learning can hop over to VIPKid and earn up to $20 an hour teaching English to second language learners. Similar to working for a ridesharing company, you can often set your own hours and workload by freelancing online.

Teach Other Teachers

Your experience and knowledge is worth sharing—and being paid for. Teach other educators how to use your innovative ideas by setting up courses on a platform like Udemy. Let’s say you have a curriculum that incorporates social media, or have a communication style that works with even the most distant of parents. You can create an online course and promote it on Udemy for other educators to learn from.

Caring for Others

Summer is a great time to earn extra cash as a babysitter, dog walker, or part-time caregiver. With kids out of school for the summer, many parents scramble to find accommodations, and who wouldn’t love an in-home summer nanny who is a certified teacher? On websites like Sittercity.com, you can apply for jobs that involve—you guessed it—caring for others, which is something teachers tend to excel at.

Be Wise About Managing Your Finances

Whichever gig you choose, be sure to start by creating a financial plan. When starting your own business, you need to spend your money wisely; one way to do that is to choose the right credit card. Many business credit cards offer cash back rewards, which could help you purchase more materials for your classroom, while others help you build credit, which would be very helpful for a new business. Having a business credit card can also help you establish and stick with a budget for keeping your venture up and running. Many websites for these cards have built-in budgeting tools, and seeing a breakdown of your expenses each month—although you should check them at least weekly—will help you see where your money is going and whether you’re investing it in the right areas.

Whether you need the extra income or just want to stay busy, summer is a great time for teachers to flex their entrepreneurial muscles. You can teach kids English online or walk dogs in your neighborhood. You can help make sure college prep test questions are up to snuff, or hop in your car and drive people around town. Your expertise as an educator can be your strength in a side gig.

Fighting back from the Global South: Education reform, teacher’s rights, and social media resistance in Mexico

Today’s blogger is David Ramírez Plascencia, a professor and researcher at the University of Guadalajara–SUV, whose recently published article “Education Reform, Teacher Resistance, and Social Media Activism in Mexico, 2013–2016” appears in the special issue of The Educational Forum on educator activism in politically polarized times. In that article, he relates how Mexican teachers use information technologies to engage in the fight against new regulations that affect their labor rights.

In recent decades, education systems in developed and poor countries have been impacted by neoliberalism tendencies that emphasis cost-benefit factors to the detriment of social access and equity. Public education in Mexico has not been an exception. In 2012, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto ordered the establishment of an educational reform. Teachers unions claimed the reform’s lack of legitimacy because they were never consulted; and since 2013, there have been several offline and online protests.

In general terms, most of the dissatisfaction concerning this reform centers on the fact that it tends to blame teachers for Mexico’s low-quality levels of education and standing among countries internationally. In addition, the amendment fails to offer appropriate instruments to improve education quality and applies a standard evaluation system that puts teachers under the microscope without consideration of important economic, administrative, infrastructural, and cultural differences among local education systems.

In this work, I focus not only on describing social media activism in education, both pro- and anti-reform, but I also consider how these virtual spaces have strengthened as an alternative media for teachers to fight back against governmental policies.

Meme example. An indigenous lady with a kerchief and the phrase in Spanish “We all are Oaxaca.” This slogan supports teachers’ actions in that state. This visual element is used frequently online to protest Mexico’s education reform.

My article stands mainly on two concepts. The first is “digital discourse,” which encompasses all sequences of interconnected ideas that span across digital media—audio, video, or even “meme” (see illustration). All these media consolidate to create dissidence with which to combat government actions. In other words, they are “weapons of the weak,” which is the second concept, referring to a particular form of resistance in which the oppressed use alternative and hidden strategies, aside from military hostility, to confront authority (J. C. Scott, 1987). What is remarkable in this context is how Mexican teachers use a dissident strategy of diverse multimedia elements as weapons against the educational reform.

In the end, the purpose of my contribution to this issue of The Educational Forum is to emphasize how cases like the teachers unions’ use of social media to support protests in Mexico provide substantial examples that might be replicated. This kind of media encourages movements and communities to have a voice to advocate for their demands, in spite of the government-controlled traditional media like the press or television. However, what is important to recall is that in order to improve education in Mexico, it is important to promote social assets like equality and justice, not only inside the government, and to modernize teachers’ unions as well, to open elections to a clear and democratic process, and to set strong transparent policies regarding usage of members’ dues. We must remember that providing quality education is a challenging task that can be addressed only with the collaborative efforts of all.

I hope you enjoy reading about this issue!

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from the special issue of The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through July 31, 2018.

Important Announcement from KDP

Dear KDP Member,

As an ardent believer in the power of education to effect positive change in the world, having a job that allows me to serve teachers—those who make that change possible—is a dream come true.

However, after 17 wonderful years, the time has come for me to step aside. I will be relinquishing my position as Executive Director of Kappa Delta Pi at the end of December 2018.

I am so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with such dedicated and hard-working staff, volunteers, and board members who share my belief that there is no profession as important as teaching. In our role of serving and supporting you—members of the KDP community—we celebrate your successes and share your concerns and challenges.

Over the years, I developed many special and supportive friendships for which I am most grateful. It is because of so many of you who have served as volunteers and leaders, who have taken on projects and so generously shared your expertise, that KDP and I have been successful in serving educators and contributing to the teaching profession.

As I reflect on my tenure with the Society, I’m pleased that we have been able to offer financial support to our practicing professionals through our Classroom Teacher Grants; have grown internationally, which has served to enrich the KDP community; have become an NGO of the United Nations, which has allowed KDP to be a leader in sustainable education; and have increased our professional support of all educators, including a soon-to-be-announced professional development program. None of these things would have happened without the commitment and hard work of so many people, both members and staff.

Some of you may be familiar with my “Faye-isms,” which have become part of the Headquarters culture. These are phrases I frequently use in discussions about members and the development of resources and services. I would like to conclude this note with a few as a reminder of what drives the work we do.

“People join people, not organizations.”
This has been true from the day Kappa Delta Pi was founded in 1911. In one way or another, people want to connect with others and for professionals, it is the best way to improve our practice.

“Never assume you know what members need.”
There is a lot of talk in the media and in politics about what teachers want and need in order to be successful; and often education reforms fail because actual teachers were never consulted. We strive to keep educators involved in all decisions made regarding membership benefits, events, and programs.

“When it comes to service, kill them with kindness.”
It’s 2018. The reality is that our lives are over-programmed; we are all busier than we ever imagined. We have made it a priority to design positive experiences from the first day of KDP membership.

While it will be difficult to leave, I deeply appreciate having had the honor and privilege to serve you—you who make the difference in the lives of our youth every single day. I will miss you, but I am excited about KDP’s future and the many new opportunities that are on the horizon. I look forward to seeing a new leader advancing KDP’s important mission to the next level.

Sincerely,

Faye Snodgress
Executive Director

Kappa Delta Pi and CourseNetworking Team Up to Support New Teachers

(INDIANAPOLIS)—Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, is partnering with CourseNetworking (CN), an innovative Indianapolis-based technology company in education, to draw on the Society’s rich legacy of high standards and excellence to support the professional growth and retention of new teachers.

Beginning teachers have high turnover rates that cost schools billions of dollars each year. One effective way to combat the revolving door of teachers and its negative effects on schools and students is to offer new teachers professional development. Dr. Richard Ingersoll, a prominent researcher and member of KDP’s esteemed Laureate Chapter, shared, “Somewhere between 40 and 50 percent of those that go into teaching are gone within 5 years.” KDP is perfectly positioned to address the needs of beginning teachers, as the organization has a presence on the campuses of more than 650 institutions nationwide, helping to graduate nearly 10,000 education students into the profession each year.

Beginning in fall 2018, KDP will offer new opportunities for educators to expand their knowledge and skills through online learning as well as to establish a permanent eportfolio. A selection of courses, which will be both affordable and convenient, will help teachers develop competencies that can be applied immediately in their classrooms. After successfully proving their competencies in each course, teachers will earn micro-credentials in the form of official badges, and have an opportunity to earn certificates they can use as proof of their skills, as continuing education, and as evidence of these accomplishments on their eportfolio. Among the initial topics for P–12 teachers will be areas that KDP research has identified to be the most challenging for new teachers. The majority of the course offerings will be asynchronous, with learner engagement both independently and within an online community.

“CN is very excited to work with KDP in implementing the most advanced new-age learning environment, the CN Learning Suite,” shared Dr. Ali Jafari, CN Chairman and CEO. “The CN LMS provides easy access to new KDP certification and badge-based courses while the CN Social Network connects KDP members globally to network and collaborate. The CN ePortfolio offers a lifelong professional cyber image for all KDP members. With this collaboration, we can change the way scholarly societies network and conduct continued professional development.”

KDP President-Elect Dr. Victoria Tusken, who has worked in education for 30 years—including 4 as a Secondary Curriculum Coordinator in Illinois—believes that KDP has an opportunity to be at the forefront of ongoing professional growth for teachers. “To think about micro-credentialing in terms of steps toward mastering specific skills is just good professional development,” said Tusken. “The typical professional development never sticks. Practitioners need ownership of their professional development, and the ‘one-size-fits-all’ format often pushed down from districts proves to be viewed by practitioners as a waste of their time. But, to provide short courses around specific topics and competencies has a deep impact and a lasting value for practitioners.”

Though the initial offerings will be geared toward practicing P–12 educators, KDP plans to leverage its innovative model to address all three major focus areas of the Society’s current strategic vision, which are to (1) Recruit qualified candidates into the profession, (2) Support and enhance quality preparation of teachers, and (3) Retain effective teachers—particularly in high needs areas.

The projected timeline will make the courses and eportfolio available to KDP members and other educators prior to the Society’s 52nd Convocation, to be held in Indianapolis, IN from Wednesday, October 31 through Saturday, November 3, 2018. This year’s Convocation, themed ”Designing the Future,” will feature a cutting-edge experience where all attendees of all generations and experience levels not only gain knowledge and strategies, but also collaborate to design a future that is sustainable, equitable, and promising for ALL learners.

For more information about the eportfolio, please visit http://www.thecn.com/eportfolio, and for more information about KDP, please visit http://www.kdp.org. You can view the official press release here.

About Kappa Delta Pi
Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, was founded in 1911 at the University of Illinois to foster excellence in education and promote fellowship among those dedicated to teaching. As a professional membership association and international honor society in education, KDP provides programs, services, and resources to its member educators to support and enhance their professional growth—all in an effort to advance quality education for all and to inspire teachers to prepare all learners for future challenges. With more than 650 active chapters and nearly 40,000 active members, the organization has seen great accomplishments and milestones in its 107-year history and is looking forward to a future where all children receive a quality education.

About CourseNetworking, LLC
CourseNetworking (CN) has a unique, next-generation technology solution for the education Industry supported by many years of thinking and research invested prior to the commercialization of the product. Built on a global education platform, the CN Suite offers a comprehensive Learning Management System (LMS), Social Portfolio, Global Academic Social Network, and Badging, as well as other social collaboration functionalities to transform teaching and learning. The CN was built to ensure that teaching and learning opportunities are available for everyone, anywhere in the world, at any time, through the web or the mobile app. The CN also provides a full turnkey solution for system implementation in institutions. The CN is the fourth major research and entrepreneurial project of the IUPUI CyberLab. The CourseNetworking LLC was created by a capital investment from Indiana University and Ali Jafari in 2011.

Moving Beyond Figuring It Out on Your Own: Preparing and Developing Linguistically Responsive Teachers

Today’s blogger is Meghan Bratkovich, Doctoral Candidate in Teacher Education and Teacher Development at Montclair State University, a contributor to the special issue of The Educational Forum on linguistically diverse students. See this month’s free article from that issue of The Educational Forum.

“How did you learn how to do this?” 

I had just observed a high school math teacher, highly effective by about every formal and informal measure, teaching a lesson to a class of English language learners (ELLs). Due to a shortage of credentialed bilingual teachers, Mr. Erickson, a self-described monolingual, had been identified to teach a section of bilingual geometry. As much Spanish as English rattled around the classroom as students excitedly reasoned through the differences between lines and line segments, actively debating their way through the classwork.

Though little in his prior education or experience had prepared him for this task, Mr. Erickson was managing to teach geometry under these constraints, and teach it well.

“I don’t know, I guess I just figured it out on my own,” Mr. Erickson said, breathing a heavy sigh. “I don’t even know if it’s what I should be doing.”

“What if you hadn’t agreed to teach this class?” I asked.

“They’d probably be sitting at the back of some mainstream classroom, not understanding anything,” he replied.

Every school has its “Mr. Erickson” among the teachers who are willing to go above and beyond, the ones who will work with students with whom they can only imperfectly communicate—the teachers who always seem to make it work. We also probably know the other teachers—those Mr. Erickson referenced—who are so unsure of how to help a struggling ELL sitting at the back of their class that they do nothing, which is exactly what they’ve been or feel prepared to do. The teaching of ELLs is too important to fall solely on the shoulders of good teachers who feel un- or underprepared.

Teachers looking to build or improve their teaching of ELLs can see this special issue of The Educational Forum as their invitation into an established community of inquiry seeking to make sense of the complexity of teaching ELLs and strengthen teaching practices. The community shares knowledge and research geared toward helping teachers feel as prepared to respond to the needs of their language learner students as they feel to teach their content. Collectively, the reviews, studies, and commentaries in this issue point to the need for linguistically responsive teachers—those who can teach academic content in ways that are comprehensible while simultaneously attending to and furthering the development of students’ language skills.

Teachers beginning their journeys into teaching ELLs might be drawn to Athanases and Wong (2018), who offer evidence that can help teachers to tailor their practitioner inquiry, systematically study their students, and develop an asset-based orientation that fosters inclusive practice. Individuals seeking research-based ELL writing programs can look to Haas, Goldman, and Faltis (2018), who provide a deep dive into transdisciplinary best practices for writing at middle and high school levels.

Those looking to better understand the broad landscape of research on how teachers learn to teach ELLs can look to literature reviews from Villegas, SaizdeLaMora, Martin, and Mills (2018) and Lucas, Strom, Bratkovich, and Wnuk (2018). These reviews provide readers with a succinct synthesis of research studies conducted to date, condensing decades of research and helping to situate, contextualize, and explain the anecdotal experiences that teachers like Mr. Erickson live every day in their classrooms.

Lastly, de Jong, Naranjo, Li, and Ouzia (2018) provide pathways for teacher educators and teacher leaders to support teachers in building their confidence and competence around their ELL teaching practices. The authors emphasize that transforming education for ELLs necessitates preparing the preparers and inclusively brings teacher educators, administrators, and supervisors into the cultivation of a linguistically responsive approach to education.

It is vital that all teachers feel confident and competent teaching ELLs. However, no teacher should be forced to figure it out on their own, to needlessly reinvent the wheel, or to start from scratch. Students deserve better. Teachers deserve better. This special issue offers multiple entry points into conversations and communities striving for better, practical, and pervasive understandings of linguistically responsive teaching to ground teacher leaders and teacher educators, prepare and support teachers, and ultimately serve students.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from the special issue of The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through June 30, 2018.