Every Student Succeeds Act: School Leadership Interventions

This is part of a series of blog posts by the KDP Public Policy Committee that examine the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA), a law that outlines the federal government’s role in education. The purpose of the series is to educate KDP members about this important law and its impact on their work as educators.

The only thing that makes the leader special is that she or he is a better follower: better at articulating the purposes of the community; more passionate about them, more willing to take time to pursue them.Thomas Sergiovanni

In the wake of the growing school accountability movement, campus leaders are facing immense pressure to improve student achievement.

In response, the role of principal has moved beyond focusing merely on campus administration to serving as an instructional leader, a profession requiring expertise in assessment, instruction, curriculum, and data analysis. However, given the complexities of human interactions, intervention strategies, and student learning, boosting student achievement is not always a simple matter. Schools are unique places; relationships among school employees, students, and families more closely resemble those in a family or small community—and applying managerial principles to places characterized by crayons and e-books presents challenges not typically found in most organizations.

Why do administrators struggle with making strides in improving student achievement?

Perhaps part of the problem lies with graduate leadership programs in the preparation of future principals. While many graduate programs do concentrate on instructional strategies with an emphasis toward school leadership interventions, some unfortunately do not adequately prepare principals for today’s realities. As a result, campus leaders fall short in applying effective interventions when addressing the challenges of improving student achievement.

Whatever the cause, there is good news when it comes to the development and implementation of school leadership intervention programs—long recognized as a vital component of educational improvement. With the passage of ESSA, states and local education agencies now have added opportunities for funding evidence-based intervention programs that target school leadership.

Funding for school leadership intervention is available through several title programs in ESSA.

Not only can Title I funds be used to support school leadership initiatives, but under ESSA guidelines, states can also use up to 2% of their Title II funds to create or expand teacher-, principal-, or leadership-preparation programs for those serving in high-need schools. Moreover, an additional 3% of Title II funds can be earmarked for leadership development—including academies, training programs, or other support for school leaders—for a total of 5% set aside for initiatives to improve leader and teacher training.

While states have always been allowed to use Title II funds for principals and school leaders, resources dedicated to educator development have traditionally gone to teachers.

Not surprisingly, school leadership experts have commended this legislation “for recognizing the role principals and school leaders play in teacher and student success, for the clarity on the uses of funds, for including teacher-leaders and principal supervisors in the programs that could be funded under Title II, and for providing concrete examples of initiatives that states may consider.”

With states playing a pivotal role in the implementation of ESSA, our work as educators to respond to the new legislation is just in the beginning stages. We have seen the research and read countless stories pointing toward the positive effect principals can have on student achievement.

Given that ESSA puts a greater emphasis on program development at the state and local levels through increased federal funding, including on activities such as recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers and principals and the Student Support and Academic Enrichment program, it is now up to these agencies to collaborate with stakeholders, including parents and teachers, to fill in the gaps.

Call to Action

Join this week’s ESSA discussion on KDP Global about these questions:

  1. Who are the primary stakeholders that states and districts need to involve when selecting evidence-based school leadership activities? Why is their feedback important?
  2. Do you agree with the quote from Thomas Sergiovanni at the beginning of the blog post? Why or why not?

image_millerDr. Gary Miller is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies at the University of Texas Tyler and a member of the Kappa Delta Pi Public Policy Committee.

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