Fostering Critical Thinkers and Innovators Who Will Create a Sustainable World

By Lucijan Jovic and Matteo Itri

Education is an integral component of students’ lives and it is rooted in instilling the respective skills needed to read proficiently, think critically, and write with clarity, all of which are essential with today’s complex and rigorous academic standards. Learners begin to develop literacy through their experiences and paying attention to their surroundings. Students begin to acquire academic and cultural awareness through their educators’ instructional approaches. Reading and writing proficiently are two skills that not only prepare students for their years in academia, but in the workforce that follows.

KDP and the United Nations

Being a student at Molloy College and a member of the student government association, Lucijan has “acquired the specific knowledge, attitude, [and] skills [which mediated] the sources of [his] cultural identity” (Cushner, et al, 2006, p.53). Molloy College has taught him to become resilient, never give up, and continue to work hard to become successful. Although any institution can focus on these, Molloy does so through the development of a community. Regardless of one’s position at the college, all are clearly committed to the value system of creating a welcoming and respectable environment where everyone can share their opinions and acquire academic/cultural discourse together. Using a sense of community as a socializing agent in the classroom, Lucijan will work to mold his future students into community builders who value the various backgrounds that exist in the class. Through this, students will gain a skill that is essential in academia and the workforce, collaboration.

As a United Nations Representative, Vice-President for Kappa Delta Pi (Molloy’s Chapter), and former Academic Chair of the Molloy Student Government Association, Lucijan serves as the liaison between students and faculty and works to not only promote awareness of various academic disciplines, but to lead a team in addressing academic concerns that arise. These major leadership roles have shaped Lucijan into the leader he is today through the socialization or “social patterns of behaviors” he executes on a daily basis (Cushner, et al, 2006, p.55). Even though most of his time is spent with upset or frustrated students, he makes it a priority to actively listen to students and faculty and work with them to arrive at possible solutions. He communicates with educators, professors, students, and other members of the learning community on a weekly basis.

The United Nations has designed 17 sustainable development goals to create a more realistic future for communities. College students must make themselves familiar with and implement these goals, because they will have an impact on society for the generations to come. The knowledge and skills acquired at colleges and universities combined with the sustainable development goals set forth by the UN will foster civically engaged individuals who will make their communities more sustainable. Through these collaborative exchanges of discourse, Lucijan has broadened his teaching/learning horizon, which has fueled his drive to best meet the needs of students and foster critical thinkers.

Adapting a Growth Mindset Is One Approach

Encouraging students to adopt a growth mindset will not only be invaluable to their success as students, but as individuals beyond the classroom who understand that struggle and adversity are the foundation of success in all areas of life. Dweck (2006), articulates that a fixed mindset is the belief that we cannot improve upon our basic abilities and talents and are limited to these fixed traits. However, a growth mindset is the belief that we can improve our basic abilities and talents through persistent effort and dedication to our craft.

As educators, our job is to not only provide students with the highest quality of instruction, but to also give them the necessary tools to be successful beyond academia. We can use several pedagogical approaches in our classrooms to promote a growth mindset, and it all starts with teaching students how the brain works. Teaching students about the concept of neuroplasticity, how our brains form new neurons when we learn new concepts, will help them become actively engaged in the learning process (Robinson, 2017). When we are introducing a new concept to our students, we demonstrate the intent to them, so they’ll buy into our pedagogical approaches. We can help our students adapt a growth mindset by utilizing strategies such as retrieval study methods, normalizing mistakes and failures, using positive reinforcement when giving feedback to students, and encouraging students to set goals for themselves (Robinson, 2017).

Additionally, demonstrating to students the major difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset is crucial to instilling this concept in our students. Those who develop a growth mindset believe that we have the power and ability to reach any goal. Dweck (2006), explains that children need honest, constructive feedback to truly grow from moments of adversity and struggle. We must challenge our students to reflect on the mindsets that they adapt, teach them that growth is a never-ending process that gives us the necessary tools to succeed. Through this approach, we are fostering independent individuals who will create a more sustainable world.

References

Cushner, K., McClelland, A., & Safford, P. (2006). Human diversity in education. Boston: McGraw-Hill. Culture and the Culture-Learning Process. Dweck, C. S. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. New York: Random House. Robinson, C. (2017). Growth mindset in the classroom. Science Scope, 41(2), 18-21. https://molloy.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://www-proquest-com.molloy.idm.oclc.org/scholarly-j ournals/growth-mindset-classroom/docview/1942178538/se-2?accountid=28076

Lucijan Jovic is a Graduate student in the School of Education and Human Services at Molloy College. He currently serves as the Vice-President for Molloy’s Kappa Delta Pi chapter and is a Representative to the United Nations in NYC. In addition, he served as the Academic Chair of Molloy Student Government for three years, Head Orientation Leader, Student Ambassador, Peer Mentor, sits on several committees, works as a Graduate Assistant, and is also an Intern for the Department of Special Education.

Matteo Itri is also a Graduate student in the School of Education and Human Services at Molloy College. Aside from teaching, Matteo is the captain of the Molloy College Cross Country/Track and Field programs, Student Ambassador, Social Media Ambassador, Orientation Leader, served as a Resident Assistant, and Executive member of the Student Athletic Advisory Committee.

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