Focusing on African American Male Preservice Teachers

Today’s bloggers are Samantha L. Strachan and Jillian Davis, who co-authored the article Loud and Clear: The Importance of Telling the Stories of African American Male Preservice Teachers,” which appears in the latest issue of The Educational Forum.

Close your eyes for a few seconds and think about all the teachers who taught you.

How many of your teachers have been African American males?

If you thought about your past experiences as a student, and your answer was “none,” you are not alone. In fact, many students in today’s P–12 schools will never have the opportunity to be taught by an African American male teacher. While a number of programs and initiatives have been implemented across the country to place Black men in classrooms, there is still much work to be done.

The Problem

Educational leaders and researchers alike have focused on several issues that impact the teaching profession. One issue that continues to make headlines is the absence of African American male teachers in P–12 schools. Currently, around 2% of all teachers in the United States identify as Black males (U.S. Department of Education, 2016). This dire statistic means that concerted efforts must be made to understand how these men can be recruited and retained in classrooms as teachers. Neglecting to do so will continue to result in their absence from the classrooms and from the lives of the students who most need them.

In our article in the current issue of The Educational Forum, “Loud and Clear: The Importance of Telling the Stories of African American Male Preservice Teachers,” we advocate for understanding the perspectives of African American men on the pathway to the teaching profession. We make an argument for placing the stories of Black male teacher education candidates front and center in education. We encourage understanding of why they decide to become teachers, despite not always having had good experiences in P–12 schools as students. We also discuss how, even as preservice teachers, men of color can experience challenges that, if not confronted, can continue to hinder them from fully participating in the teaching profession.

Transforming the Profession, One Story at a Time

Stories can be powerful. Like all teachers, African American men have stories that need to be shared and heard. These stories can provide the impetus needed to transform how they experience the teaching profession. However, their stories must be told and highlighted in a way that does not perpetuate stereotypes and negative notions, but instead will further how the education and research community could make changes to ensure that Black men can fully engage with the teaching profession. This is especially true for men in teacher education programs.

Since the stories of Black male preservice teachers are rarely highlighted, it is important to use their perspectives as a foundation for understanding the specific changes needed in the teaching field, and how these changes could be implemented in a manner that allows men of color to thrive in the profession.

African American male preservice teachers are uniquely positioned to provide insights that could be transformative to the teaching field. They have made the decision to become educators, and their perspectives, especially during training, can serve as reflections for teacher education and the teaching profession.

If we want to know how we can engage African American males as educators, providing spaces for them to share their stories will be important.

Not doing so will continue to sideline a group of educators whose impact in classrooms could be great.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through March 31, 2019.

References

  1. S. Department of Education. (2016). The state of racial diversity in the educator workforce. Retrieved from https://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/highered/racial-diversity/state-racial-diversity-workforce.pdf

Dr. Samantha Strachan

Dr. Samantha L. Strachan is Interim Chairperson of the Department of Teacher Education and Leadership at Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University. She also serves as Director of the M.AL.E. (Males for Alabama Education) Initiative, a state-funded program focused on recruiting and preparing minority men for P–12 classrooms. Dr. Strachan’s research is focused on improving minority students’ participation in teacher education, particularly in the STEM fields. Her work also focuses on examining creative ways to diversify the teaching workforce. This includes sharing the stories, perspectives, and experiences of African American men on the teaching pathway.

Jillian Davis

Jillian Davis is a MEd candidate in Elementary Education at Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University. Her current research explores the stories of African American male preservice teachers, discussing their personal experiences, understanding their perspectives, and raising awareness of their impact on education. Jillian’s interests include the study of social justice in education, inequality, and poverty. Jillian serves as a graduate assistant.

Remembering Clementine

Clementine SkinnerIt seems fitting during Black History Month to honor and remember Dr. Clementine A. Skinner (1916–2006), KDP’s first African-American president. She served from 1976-1978.

Clementine was born in Birmingham, Ala., the daughter of John and Alice McConico. Her family relocated to Chicago during the Great Northern Migration, partly due to controversy caused by her father’s involvement in the civil rights movement.  In Chicago, her father owned McConico’s Book and Magazine store, which housed and sold publications by and about African Americans.

Beyond being an academic and trailblazing Kadelpian, she was instrumental in preserving and sharing African-American history, a passion which was influenced largely by her experience at her father’s bookstore. Skinner was a close friend and contemporary of the founder of the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History (ASALH), Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who is credited with creating the celebration that evolved into Black History Month in 1926.

As I was researching her life, I came across a CNN article from Feb. 14, 1996, 18 years ago today. The article quoted a then 80-year-old Skinner as a representative from the ASALH. In that article, Skinner said, “We never sat around and spent all our time worrying about being segregated…We worked for integration constantly in all areas of society.”

Her life’s legacy illustrates that quote perfectly. After she graduated high school, Clementine went to work at Woolworth’s, where she worked her way from salesclerk to floor manager and eventually buyer, the first African American to be promoted to this position. She began using her position to create change and was instrumental in getting items like cosmetics and hosieries for women of color. Her letters to the corporate offices also impacted the company’s employment practices as they related to minorities.

After becoming a mother and serving in the First Women’s Army Corps, she began her college career in 1953 at the age of 41. She received an associate’s degree in 1959. She then enrolled in Chicago Teachers College—now known as Chicago State University—and received a bachelor’s degree in education in 1960 (she was initiated into Theta Rho Chapter that year) and a master’s degree in1963.

In 1976, the same year she became KDP president, Clementine earned an Ed.D from Nova University in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. She was 60 years old.

We are so proud to have had Dr. Clementine Skinner as a member, past president, and distinguished educator, and we celebrate and honor her during Black History Month.

Beginning Teacher Resilience: Considerations for Formal and Informal Mentoring

Today’s blogger is Dr. Brie Morettini, who authored “Building Beginning Teacher Resilience: Exploring the Relationship Between Mentoring and Contextual Acceptance,” published in The Educational Forum.

Each year, teacher candidates across the country graduate from colleges of education. Many of these recent graduates already have teaching jobs lined up for the following school year, while many more work earnestly and excitedly on applications for positions.

These beginning teachers are enthusiastic and qualified and possess the pedagogical content knowledge needed to effectively reach the diverse learners who will fill their classrooms. Yet, much more remains for them to learn—so much that it is hard to learn it all in a methods course, a clinical practice seminar, or even through a high-stakes assessment.

For those of us who look back fondly on our years spent in classrooms, the gift of time has rendered our daily challenges and struggles into memories. For beginning teachers, however, these struggles are not memories—they are living, breathing, real elements of their everyday lives in the classroom. The ability to thrive despite the daily struggles of teaching are what we have come to understand as resilience.

Scholarly and practical interest in teacher resilience has emerged as a topic of international interest, as the need to develop a stable teaching force has arisen as a global commitment.

To better understand the nuances of beginning teacher resilience, we sought to develop a study that focused on one rather commonplace aspect of beginning teacher resilience development: mentoring. I recently co-authored a piece with Dr. Kathryn Luet and Dr. Lisa Vernon-Dotson about mentoring as an element of building resilience, which is featured in The Educational Forum and is titled “Building Beginning Teacher Resilience: Exploring the Relationship Between Mentoring and Contextual Acceptance.”

Research shows that beginning teachers who receive mentoring from more seasoned, veteran teachers are more likely to return to their high-needs school than teachers who do not receive mentoring. Mentoring, therefore, has become a widely practiced aspect of first-year induction for beginning teachers in an effort to retain talent and diminish the high rates of teacher turnover that plague the profession, particularly in high-needs schools.

Our study is part of a larger grant-funded project aimed at improving mentor quality by drawing on tenets of sociocultural theory. We maintain that individuals learn and grow when educational opportunities attend to environmental factors and teachers’ specific needs, and when such opportunities progress in logical stages promoting incremental learning and growth. Specifically, the context in which beginning teachers work influences their learning about the nature of the profession.

As part of our grant-funded project, cohorts of mentor teachers received 2 years of intensive professional development on culturally responsive pedagogy, anti-racist education, and critical friends’ groups. These topics were identified through a large-scale needs assessment with teachers from Hillside Public Schools. This represents an organic approach to mentoring targeted at the needs articulated directly by beginning teachers.

The study explores whether and to what extent, if at all, this targeted mentoring support contributed to beginning teachers’ resilience.

What we found throughout our study was that resilience is best achieved through a nested approach. More specifically, beginning teachers begin to build resilience when they experience layers of contextual acceptance: acceptance from students, colleagues, and the larger community. And, mentoring offers entrée into feelings of acceptance from colleagues, which consequently prompts some beginning teachers to feel belonging or acceptance from their students and ultimately the larger community in which they teach. The feelings of belonging and acceptance that a range of mentoring experiences creates for beginning teachers enhances resilience, which helps beginning teachers overcome their perceived lack of preparation for the rigors of teaching, particularly in a high-needs setting.

The beginning teachers in this study referenced the support they received from some level of mentoring, whether the support occurred as formal mentoring required by the state for first-year teachers or as more informal, sporadic mentoring from colleagues. The study illuminates the importance of formal and informal mentoring spaces for beginning teachers and of building a community of support and acceptance so that beginning teachers can manage and overcome the chronic and acute stresses that accompany teaching.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through March 31, 2019.

Dr. Brie Morettini

Dr. Brie Morettini is an Associate Professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary and Inclusive Education at Rowan University. She teaches courses on research literature and analysis, working with families and communities, and inclusive early childhood and elementary education. Her research focuses on beginning teacher identity development, beginning teachers’ perspectives on the profession, and the use of self-study methodologies to uncover and acknowledge epistemological frames.

 

 

The Future is STEM: Why We Need to Engage Girls Early

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that jobs in STEM will have higher than average projected growth in the next ten years but only a small fraction of girls and women are likely to pursue degrees in STEM.

Despite many initiatives and efforts, women continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields.

In Cracking the Code, a report on STEM education for girls and women put forth by UNESCO, Irina Bokova, UNESCO’s Director-General states: “Only 17 women have won a Nobel Prize in physics, chemistry, or medicine since Marie Curie in 1903, compared to 572 men. Today, only 28% of all of the world’s researchers are women. Such huge disparities, such deep inequality, do not happen by chance.”

The reasons behind why girls and women are underrepresented in STEM fields are complex (see Dr. Yvonne Skipper’s recent KDP blog post).

Microsoft recently funded a research project that indicated that a variety of reasons exist why.  For instance, it was found that girls tend to lose interest in STEM subjects around middle school (Tan, E., Calabrese Barton, A., Kang, H., & O’Neill, T., 2013). Identity and stereotypes related to membership in STEM fields can have a dampening effect on motivation to pursue STEM for many girls (Shapiro, J. R., & Williams, A. M., 2012). Confidence also plays a big role in motivation and orientation towards STEM fields (Heaverlo, C. (2011). STEM development: A study of 6th-12th grade girls’ interest and confidence in mathematics and science.)

Gladly, research into this critical issue has also demonstrated some proven strategies that work:

  • Teacher and parent influences and role modeling help: studies show encouragement from parents and teachers can have a profound effect on STEM engagement among girls and increases motivation for entering into the field (Rabenberg, T. A., 2013).
  • After-school programs and science clubs: Research also indicates that schools and communities need to invest in and provide space and opportunity for girls to engage in STEM.  (Tyler-Wood, T., Ellison, A., Lim, O., & Periathiruvadi, S., 2012 and Vingilis-Jaremko, L., 2010)
  • Inquiry-based STEM curriculum plays a role: Transforming STEM curriculum from learning and memorizing to doing has, time and time again, shown to elicit interest from all students in STEM: (Burns, H.D. & Staus, N, 2016)

Women make up 49.6% of the world population.

It’s crucial that, as STEM careers and industries grow, women continue to be a strong part of the progression.

The best practices for involving women comes early in their lives through schools, teachers, parents, and communities.

Dr. Mubina Schroeder

Dr. Mubina Schroeder is an Associate Professor at Molloy College, where she co-directs the Cognition and Learning Lab.  She is a Kappa Delta Pi United Nations Professional Representative and serves on the Board of Directors for the United Nations NGO/DPI.

References

Burns, H. D., Lesseig, K., & Staus, N. (2016, October). Girls’ interest in STEM. In 2016 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) (pp. 1-5). IEEE.

Tyler-Wood, T., Ellison, A., Lim, O., & Periathiruvadi, S. (2012). Bringing up girls in science (BUGS): The effectiveness of an afterschool environmental science program for increasing female students’ interest in science careers. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 21(1), 46-55.

Vingilis-Jaremko, L. (2010). How Science Clubs Can Support Girls’ Interest in Science. LEARNing Landscapes, 3(2), 155-160.

Rabenberg, T. A. (2013). Middle school girls’ STEM education: Using teacher influences, parent encouragement, peer influences, and self efficacy to predict confidence and interest in math and science

Tan, E., Calabrese Barton, A., Kang, H., & O’Neill, T. (2013). Desiring a career in STEM‐related fields: How middle school girls articulate and negotiate identities‐in‐practice in science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 50(10), 1143-1179.

Shapiro, J. R., & Williams, A. M. (2012). The role of stereotype threats in undermining girls’ and women’s performance and interest in STEM fields. Sex Roles, 66(3-4), 175-183.

Rabenberg, T. A. (2013). Middle school girls’ STEM education: Using teacher influences, parent encouragement, peer influences, and self efficacy to predict confidence and interest in math and science (Doctoral dissertation, Drake University).

Steinke, J. (2017). Adolescent girls’ STEM identity formation and media images of STEM professionals: Considering the influence of contextual cues. Frontiers in psychology, 8, 716.

LGBTQ+ Families Speak Out

Today’s bloggers are Pamela Baer, Tara Goldstein, and Jenny Salisbury from the University of Toronto. Together, they authored “Pairing Verbatim Theatre and Theatre of the Oppressed to Provoke Startling Empathy,” published in The Educational Forum.

Since 2014, our research team at the University of Toronto, led by Professor Tara Goldstein, has been conducting interviews with LGBTQ+ families in four different regions of Ontario about the issues they experience at school and how they work with teachers and principals to create safer and more supportive learning environments for their children.

Our findings indicate that, despite recent safe schools legislation, much work remains in helping LGBTQ+ families feel welcome at school. We have used the transcripts from these interviews to write a verbatim play called Out at School.

It is our hope that these short scenes will provide insight into the ways that participants are living with gender and sexual diversity, while also offering educators, parents, and students strategies for engaging in activism and allyship as they work to create more inclusive schooling spaces for all students. Here are a few excerpts from the play:

Excerpt From Scene 5

You have to start the work at the beginning

KARLEEN PENDLETON JIMÉNEZ

You have to start the work at the beginning. I say, even the earliest, the earliest thing that happened with [my son], was when he was in, maybe preschool or daycare or whatever they call it. You know, he was 4 and they did [this chart]. You’ll see this in the kindergarten curriculum, you know, my, you know, about family, and he had to write my mom’s name is blank, my dad’s name is blank, my siblings name are blank. And up until that time, he didn’t ever think anything was weird about our family. And then, when he had to fill that out, he just started crying, and he fell apart. He was a wreck, probably for a month over that, because the little chart didn’t match. So, [we went] to the teacher, not angry with her, but just, like, “Hey, you know this isn’t just a gay issue, like there are many different kinds of families.” And she started crying. She was really upset that she had hurt his feelings. But [she] just didn’t know, you know?

Excerpt From Scene 7

Mother’s Day and Father’s Day

MICHAEL MANCINI 

Mother’s Day and Fathers’ Day were really interesting because early on, the teachers would feel they were supporting us by having our children make Mother’s Day presents for us. But our daughters have birth mothers and they have a relationship with them.

ERNST HUPEL

We are in touch with their birth mothers. So, early on, Milena would go and say, “My teacher said I don’t have a mom, but I do, her name is Heather.” So, you know, the teachers were doing it to actually support us but after our daughters said, “No I actually have a mother” . . . they began to make Mothers’ Day cards for their birth mothers and we send the cards to them and yeah so . . . We get double Father’s Day cards.

MICHAEL MANCINI

It’s a big day.

ERNST HUPEL

It is! It’s like Christmas here.

Excerpt from Scene 7

Mother’s Day and Father’s Day

JESS SWANCE-SMITH

[Teachers shouldn’t] assume what a child’s family may look like . . . take their word for it. I mean, if they say they have multiple people in their family, let them make those, you know, 10 Mother’s Day cards that they need to make (Evan and Jess laugh). Or whatever, five Father’s Day cards because maybe there’s, you know, . . . maybe an aunt or an uncle who’s like a father or a mother to them. 

EVAN SMITH

I think one thing I really appreciate is that, for instance, at Mother’s Day, the school wasn’t sure who identified, you know, as a mother, for sure, and so they just sent out like you know a blanket message through our, you know, we have, like, an app we use to communicate with teachers and they sent out a message saying, you know, “We need to know who in your family identifies as a mother and should be getting a Mother’s Day card.”

In addition to the play, which we discuss in more depth in our article “Pairing Verbatim Theatre and Theatre of the Oppressed to Provoke Startling Empathy,” we have also published over 300 video clips from these interviews on our website: www.lgbtqfamiliesspeakout.ca. In curating the videos, we had a vision of creating a collection of community stories that can act as a resource for both parents and educators. For examples of two of our video clips, you can listen to parents . . .

…Max & Ryan talk about their hopes for teachers of trans families:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ba7DXaXzmA

…Catherine & Nazbah talk about what they think school should be:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpBSp457L24

 

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through December 31, 2019.


​Pamela Baer is a PhD candidate in Pedagogy and Curriculum at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her current research explores the use of applied theatre with young people from LGBTQ+ families to explore their experiences of school through a process of collaborative performance. Pamela is the Research Manager on the LGBTQ+ Families Speak Out project and an Instructor of Applied Theatre at Brock University.

Tara Goldstein is a professor, ethnographer, and playwright in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, University of Toronto, where she teaches an undergraduate course called Equity, Activism and Education for the Equity Studies program at New College, as well as a graduate course called Gender, Sexuality and Schooling for the Curriculum and Pedagogy program in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Tara also is the Founding and Artistic Director of Gailey Road Productions, a theatre company that produces research-informed theatre on social and political issues that affect us all.

​Jenny Salisbury is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Toronto. Her teaching and research interests include contemporary Canadian play creation and devising processes, with a focus on audience, community-engaged theatre, and the role of the artist as researcher. She is a co-founder and Associate Director of The Centre for Spectatorship and Audience Research.

Texas Teachers: Obtain CPE credits through KDP’s high-quality professional development

(INDIANAPOLIS)—Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, has been approved as a continuing professional education (CPE) provider for the State of Texas.

KDP offers online professional development to teachers at all stages of their careers through its Educator Learning Network. This innovative space integrates professional development and social networking, making learning fun and engaging. Teachers can access two types of learning experiences through the network for CPE credit:

  • Micro-credential courses: Available on topics like Classroom Management Basics, Social-Emotional Learning, Equity in Data Literacy for Teaching, Principles of Culturally Relevant Teaching, and Student Responsibility for Learning, KDP courses are authored by subject matter experts and delivered in an innovative format. Course length ranges by topic and desired outcomes. Courses are being added regularly. Some courses are free; other courses start at only $49 for members of Kappa Delta Pi and $74 for non-members. To get started with a free account and ePortfolio, visit http://ELN.kdp.org.
  • Webinars: KDP hosts webinars for teachers and administrators on topics such as What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Supporting LGBTQ Students, Data-Driven Decision Making, 8 Strategies for Success in Your First Year as a Principal, Literacy + STEAM = Learning Across All Content Areas!, and more. Live webinars take place approximately twice per month, and all recordings are saved to a catalog that can be accessed free of charge by members and used for CPE credit based on completion.

For teachers who prefer in-person professional development, KDP also hosts an international annual Convocation.

  • Educational Sessions at Convocation 2019: More than 180 breakout sessions will be a part of KDP’s programming at its annual conference, taking place October 24–26, 2019 in Norfolk, VA. Teachers can save by registering before October 3, and you can find the full schedule at https://www.kdp.org/convo2019/schedule/index.php.

With more than 3,600 active members in Texas already, KDP is looking to expand its offerings to improve teacher retention in the state. Teachers can join Kappa Delta Pi for only $50 annually by visiting our website at http://www.kdp.org.

School districts throughout the State of Texas are encouraged to contact Michelle Melani at michelle@kdp.org or by calling 800-284-3167 for a demonstration and information about using KDP courses for your teachers’ professional needs.

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About Kappa Delta Pi
Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, is a 501 (c) (3) professional membership association established in 1911 to foster excellence in education and promote fellowship among those dedicated to teaching. Today, the organization remains committed to supporting teachers by cultivating growth, leadership, and professional community—while celebrating the impact of the teaching profession. More than 1.2 million women and men have been initiated into KDP, and our diverse membership includes educators at all phases and levels of their careers. Presently, KDP is comprised of more than 700 active chapters and nearly 40,000 members worldwide.

Download the press release by clicking here.

Truth Talk: Conversations About Race

Khasnabis

Dr. Debi Khasnabis

Today’s bloggers are Debi Khasnabis and Simona Goldin, who co-authored with Ebony Perouse-Harvey and Margaret O. Hanna to write “Race and the Mona Lisa: Reflecting on Antiracist Teaching Practice,” which appears in the latest issue of The Educational Forum.

Race permeates every thread of the fabric of society in the United States, regardless of whether we recognize and speak to it.

Simona Goldin

Dr. Simona Goldin

This truth is stitched throughout all aspects of public schooling, from the gaps in academic learning opportunities that children of color experience relative to their White peers, to the racial marginalization of children at recess. This truth weakens the fabric of the institution of schooling.

As teacher–educators, we support beginning teachers in seeing and responding to the ways that race pervades children’s experiences in classrooms.

In doing so we help them leverage the knowledge that children of color and their families bring to their work in schools as well as repair the rips in the social compact.

Our current research, highlighted in “Race and the Mona Lisa: Reflecting on Antiracist Teaching Practice” in this issue of The Educational Forum, is inspired by our awareness that children’s full sets of knowledge are often unseen in schools. Children of color, especially, are unlikely to be seen for their knowledge. This invisibility occurs in instructional moments when that knowledge is related to students’ racial or ethnic identity.

What does it look like when children’s knowledge is made invisible? 

A common refrain heard in schools is “That’s racist!”

Digging into this, we were initially surprised to learn what young children identify as “racist.”

When children are raised to be “colorblind,” they can think that referring to people by their racial identifiers is racist.

What are the effects of this? From Black colleagues, we learned that their race-conscious children who had been raised to recognize, discuss, and analyze race and its associated qualities were silenced by their peers and teachers in discussions of race.

One colleague’s son, after referring to a Black person as “Black,” was hushed by a peer and told “That’s racist!” This also occurs in instructional interactions when children of color speak about race and racism. When they are silenced, what becomes invisible is their racial literacy and fluency, their advanced and sophisticated knowledge.

More than just students blister at direct discussions of race in classrooms. Teachers also frequently steer clear of discussions having to do with race.

A teacher candidate once consulted with Debi after two Black students in her science class critiqued a Bill Nye video as racist.

The students’ critique rested on their judgment that the film featured fewer people of color than White people. The teacher candidate expressed trepidation about how to handle this accusation, especially as she saw nothing “blatantly racist” in the film. She wondered how she could convey to the students that their critique was inappropriate.

These everyday occurrences affect the health and vibrancy of classrooms.

In addition to silencing students, they fail to leverage and mine the racial fluency and expertise that some students, especially students of color, can bring. Further, students whose racial fluency is undeveloped lose out on critical opportunities to speak directly about race and racism, to practice having substantive discussions about inequality, and to construct, together, a pluralistic society.

We argue teachers should model interest and engagement in the child’s thinking. When students use racial identifiers, teachers should perk up, as this is a sign that their students are bringing reservoirs of knowledge about race to this discussion. This knowledge is a rare and precious resource.

When students launch racialized critiques, this shows their teachers that they have reservoirs of knowledge about oppression.

Recognizing students’ reservoirs of racial knowledge for what they are—assets to be built upon for learning—is in the interest of the child and the learning community.

When we silence these discussions, we uphold normative ways of being that support White supremacy.

Simona Goldin teaches courses pertaining to the sociology, history, and policy of schooling in the U.S. She conducts research on ways to transform the preparation of beginning teachers to help them teach in more equitable ways and has elaborated the teaching practices that bridge children’s work in schools on academic content with their home and community-based experiences. 

Debi Khasnabis is a clinical associate professor of education and the chair of elementary teacher education at the University of Michigan School of Education. She teaches courses focusing on multicultural and multilingual education and conducts research on pedagogies of teacher education that support the development of culturally responsive teaching and understandings of inequality in schools.