Important Announcement from KDP

Dear KDP Member,

As an ardent believer in the power of education to effect positive change in the world, having a job that allows me to serve teachers—those who make that change possible—is a dream come true.

However, after 17 wonderful years, the time has come for me to step aside. I will be relinquishing my position as Executive Director of Kappa Delta Pi at the end of December 2018.

I am so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with such dedicated and hard-working staff, volunteers, and board members who share my belief that there is no profession as important as teaching. In our role of serving and supporting you—members of the KDP community—we celebrate your successes and share your concerns and challenges.

Over the years, I developed many special and supportive friendships for which I am most grateful. It is because of so many of you who have served as volunteers and leaders, who have taken on projects and so generously shared your expertise, that KDP and I have been successful in serving educators and contributing to the teaching profession.

As I reflect on my tenure with the Society, I’m pleased that we have been able to offer financial support to our practicing professionals through our Classroom Teacher Grants; have grown internationally, which has served to enrich the KDP community; have become an NGO of the United Nations, which has allowed KDP to be a leader in sustainable education; and have increased our professional support of all educators, including a soon-to-be-announced professional development program. None of these things would have happened without the commitment and hard work of so many people, both members and staff.

Some of you may be familiar with my “Faye-isms,” which have become part of the Headquarters culture. These are phrases I frequently use in discussions about members and the development of resources and services. I would like to conclude this note with a few as a reminder of what drives the work we do.

“People join people, not organizations.”
This has been true from the day Kappa Delta Pi was founded in 1911. In one way or another, people want to connect with others and for professionals, it is the best way to improve our practice.

“Never assume you know what members need.”
There is a lot of talk in the media and in politics about what teachers want and need in order to be successful; and often education reforms fail because actual teachers were never consulted. We strive to keep educators involved in all decisions made regarding membership benefits, events, and programs.

“When it comes to service, kill them with kindness.”
It’s 2018. The reality is that our lives are over-programmed; we are all busier than we ever imagined. We have made it a priority to design positive experiences from the first day of KDP membership.

While it will be difficult to leave, I deeply appreciate having had the honor and privilege to serve you—you who make the difference in the lives of our youth every single day. I will miss you, but I am excited about KDP’s future and the many new opportunities that are on the horizon. I look forward to seeing a new leader advancing KDP’s important mission to the next level.

Sincerely,

Faye Snodgress
Executive Director

Kappa Delta Pi and CourseNetworking Team Up to Support New Teachers

(INDIANAPOLIS)—Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, is partnering with CourseNetworking (CN), an innovative Indianapolis-based technology company in education, to draw on the Society’s rich legacy of high standards and excellence to support the professional growth and retention of new teachers.

Beginning teachers have high turnover rates that cost schools billions of dollars each year. One effective way to combat the revolving door of teachers and its negative effects on schools and students is to offer new teachers professional development. Dr. Richard Ingersoll, a prominent researcher and member of KDP’s esteemed Laureate Chapter, shared, “Somewhere between 40 and 50 percent of those that go into teaching are gone within 5 years.” KDP is perfectly positioned to address the needs of beginning teachers, as the organization has a presence on the campuses of more than 650 institutions nationwide, helping to graduate nearly 10,000 education students into the profession each year.

Beginning in fall 2018, KDP will offer new opportunities for educators to expand their knowledge and skills through online learning as well as to establish a permanent eportfolio. A selection of courses, which will be both affordable and convenient, will help teachers develop competencies that can be applied immediately in their classrooms. After successfully proving their competencies in each course, teachers will earn micro-credentials in the form of official badges, and have an opportunity to earn certificates they can use as proof of their skills, as continuing education, and as evidence of these accomplishments on their eportfolio. Among the initial topics for P–12 teachers will be areas that KDP research has identified to be the most challenging for new teachers. The majority of the course offerings will be asynchronous, with learner engagement both independently and within an online community.

“CN is very excited to work with KDP in implementing the most advanced new-age learning environment, the CN Learning Suite,” shared Dr. Ali Jafari, CN Chairman and CEO. “The CN LMS provides easy access to new KDP certification and badge-based courses while the CN Social Network connects KDP members globally to network and collaborate. The CN ePortfolio offers a lifelong professional cyber image for all KDP members. With this collaboration, we can change the way scholarly societies network and conduct continued professional development.”

KDP President-Elect Dr. Victoria Tusken, who has worked in education for 30 years—including 4 as a Secondary Curriculum Coordinator in Illinois—believes that KDP has an opportunity to be at the forefront of ongoing professional growth for teachers. “To think about micro-credentialing in terms of steps toward mastering specific skills is just good professional development,” said Tusken. “The typical professional development never sticks. Practitioners need ownership of their professional development, and the ‘one-size-fits-all’ format often pushed down from districts proves to be viewed by practitioners as a waste of their time. But, to provide short courses around specific topics and competencies has a deep impact and a lasting value for practitioners.”

Though the initial offerings will be geared toward practicing P–12 educators, KDP plans to leverage its innovative model to address all three major focus areas of the Society’s current strategic vision, which are to (1) Recruit qualified candidates into the profession, (2) Support and enhance quality preparation of teachers, and (3) Retain effective teachers—particularly in high needs areas.

The projected timeline will make the courses and eportfolio available to KDP members and other educators prior to the Society’s 52nd Convocation, to be held in Indianapolis, IN from Wednesday, October 31 through Saturday, November 3, 2018. This year’s Convocation, themed ”Designing the Future,” will feature a cutting-edge experience where all attendees of all generations and experience levels not only gain knowledge and strategies, but also collaborate to design a future that is sustainable, equitable, and promising for ALL learners.

For more information about the eportfolio, please visit http://www.thecn.com/eportfolio, and for more information about KDP, please visit http://www.kdp.org. You can view the official press release here.

About Kappa Delta Pi
Kappa Delta Pi (KDP), International Honor Society in Education, was founded in 1911 at the University of Illinois to foster excellence in education and promote fellowship among those dedicated to teaching. As a professional membership association and international honor society in education, KDP provides programs, services, and resources to its member educators to support and enhance their professional growth—all in an effort to advance quality education for all and to inspire teachers to prepare all learners for future challenges. With more than 650 active chapters and nearly 40,000 active members, the organization has seen great accomplishments and milestones in its 107-year history and is looking forward to a future where all children receive a quality education.

About CourseNetworking, LLC
CourseNetworking (CN) has a unique, next-generation technology solution for the education Industry supported by many years of thinking and research invested prior to the commercialization of the product. Built on a global education platform, the CN Suite offers a comprehensive Learning Management System (LMS), Social Portfolio, Global Academic Social Network, and Badging, as well as other social collaboration functionalities to transform teaching and learning. The CN was built to ensure that teaching and learning opportunities are available for everyone, anywhere in the world, at any time, through the web or the mobile app. The CN also provides a full turnkey solution for system implementation in institutions. The CN is the fourth major research and entrepreneurial project of the IUPUI CyberLab. The CourseNetworking LLC was created by a capital investment from Indiana University and Ali Jafari in 2011.

Celebrating the Life and Leadership of Dr. Frank E. Marsh

Faye Snodgress is Executive Director of Kappa Delta Pi.

Dr. Frank Marsh

With a very heavy heart, I share news of the death of Dr. Frank E. Marsh, Professor Emeritus of Northeastern University, and a truly outstanding and dedicated leader of Kappa Delta Pi International for nearly 7 decades. Inducted into KDP’s Beta Beta Chapter at The University of New Hampshire in 1949, his service goes back far enough that he had opportunities to meet the founders of KDP and often shared interesting stories about KDP in the early years.

It is fitting at his passing to acknowledge his many significant contributions to the Society. There is no one who matched his sustained effort in leadership excellence. He captured the spirit of KDP in all the work he accomplished in his professional life as a teacher, coach, university professor, and Dean. He personified the ideals of the Society.

When we reflect on his legacy, there are many significant firsts associated with his term as President of the Society (1972–1974), many of which are still in place today, such as offering regional one-day conferences for members, training of new Chapter Counselors at Headquarters, holding student forums at Convocation, and establishing the Educational Foundation, where he served as Board Chair for 18 years. During his tenure as leader, the Foundation raised millions of dollars, resulting in increased scholarships, awards to teachers, national conference sponsorships, and the completion of a fundraising campaign to purchase a new headquarters’ facility in Indianapolis.

Dr. Richard Judd (L) with Dr. Frank Marsh (C)

“Frank was the one who nominated me for President. A true leader in all respects. As Frank’s leaf dies and drops from sight, other substances of his abundant life will take their place. His place remains, and in spirit remains very, very present with us. As theologian Karl Rahner has said, ‘Every person is a person of eternity, and not just noble spirits of memory.’ All who knew Frank knew that we had been invited to a special table of life that was anything but ordinary, if not quite extraordinary. We realize that sharing his life and our participation with Frank came as a gift, not a given. We are all thankful for the opportunity we had to be part of Frank’s life—his world of the mind, family, colleagues, friends, and conviviality.” –Richard Judd, Former KDP President

In addition to his service as the Chair of the Educational Foundation, his leadership benefited the Society through his service as the Academic Editor of the Kappa Delta Pi Record from 1996 through 2001, on multiple Convocation Planning Committees, on the President’s Advisory Committee, and as the founding counselor of the Kappa Zeta Chapter at Northeastern University. A constant in all of his leadership roles was his ability to provide the vision and initiatives for improvements in these organizations.

He always provided steadfast support of the Society, the staff, and all educators in its community. His consistently positive and gracious disposition set him apart and served to make him a special mentor, coach, and beloved leader.

Honoring his significant and longtime contribution of service to Kappa Delta Pi, he was inducted in 2015 as a member of the prestigious Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter—one of the highest recognitions bestowed by the Society.

In addition to Frank’s sustained service and leadership in KDP, what impressed me most is that every conversation I ever had with Frank, he was always positive and hopeful of the great things that lie ahead. He definitely had a “glass half full” disposition . . . a most gracious and kind man. May he rest in peace.

10 Quotes About Teachers to Inspire You This Week

KDP staffers have put together a list of 10 quotes to inspire you this week. Share your favorite quotes in the comments section below!

1. “A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.” – Brad Henry

2. “A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops” – Henry Adams

3. “Teachers can change lives with just the right mix of chalk and challenges.” – Joyce Meyer

4. “I like a teacher who gives you something to take home to think about besides homework.” – Lily Tomlin

5. “I touch the future. I teach.” – Christa McAuliffe

6. “The duties of a teacher are neither few nor small, but they elevate the mind and give energy to the character” – Dorothea Dix

7. “I think the teaching profession contributes more to the future of our society than any other single profession.” – John Wooden

8. “The task of the modern educator is not to cut down jungles, but to irrigate deserts.” – C.S. Lewis

9. “Everyone who remembers his own education remembers teachers, not methods and techniques. The teacher is the heart of the educational system.” – Sidney Hook

10. “I have come to believe that a great teacher is a great artist and that there are as few as there are any other great artists. Teaching might even be the greatest of the arts since the medium is the human mind and spirit.” – John Steinbeck

Twice-Exceptional Learners: Reaching Full Potential

Today’s bloggers are Chin-Wen Lee, University of Louisville, and Jennifer A. Ritchotte, University of Northern Colorado, whose essay on twice-exceptional (2e) learners appears in The Educational Forum.

“To believe is to look at the tiniest seed and envision a blossoming flower.” —Anonymous

Schools should provide educational opportunities that help all students reach their full potential.

Too often, a focus on ensuring all students are performing at grade level overshadows the critical need to develop potential in our brightest students. A high-quality education needs to be accessible to all students; equity in education is critical. Failing to fully address the unique learning needs of gifted students implies an inequity in our educational system that is simply indefensible. Unfortunately, this issue is most pervasive for gifted students from underserved populations, such as twice-exceptional (2e) students.

Many parents of 2e students express frustration over receiving little help for their children within the school system. Parents commonly report that their requests for additional services at the school and district levels are denied because their 2e children appear to be performing at grade level. Teachers of 2e students often report this same frustration. Limited access to training and resources limits teachers’ ability to effectively meet their 2e students’ unique learning needs.

Twice-exceptional learners, defined by the National Twice-Exceptional Community of Practice (2e CoP), demonstrate “exceptional ability and disability, which results in a unique set of circumstances.” A unique set of circumstances includes masking of abilities and disabilities. The 2e CoP’s definition highlights that twice-exceptional learners “may perform below, at, or above grade level.” Supporting these learners requires specialized methods of identification, enriched educational opportunities, and simultaneous supports for academic and social-emotional growth.

A recent U.S. Supreme Court case, Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District RE-1, holds promise for providing educational services to twice-exceptional students. The Supreme Court concluded that for students with disabilities, meaningful educational benefits should be made possible through individualized education plans. In other words, providing meaningful educational benefits does not stop when students with both gifts and disabilities demonstrate that they can perform at grade level.

To provide educational services for 2e learners, educators need specialized academic training and ongoing professional learning. There is also a need for recruiting a more diverse, representative sample of professionals to support 2e learners. General and special education teachers, school counselors, school psychologists, and other specialized service professionals should be part of the teamwork.

Of course, there is no single solution that will fix the educational system for learners who are not receiving adequate opportunities for talent development. Keeping an active agenda for advocacy and striving for policy change is critical, especially given that states where the coexistence of giftedness and disabilities is addressed in state law may have better opportunities to improve their practices than states where gifted education is not mandated.

All students deserve opportunities to develop their gifts and talents. This represents a unique challenge for those parenting and teaching 2e learners because of commonly used non-comprehensive approaches to identification, a lack of training on the specialized needs of this student population, and limited access to resources that might improve 2e students’ educational experiences. We contend that the first step to empowering 2e students is to empower ourselves and those around us with the knowledge needed to provide these students with the education they deserve.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share Lee and Ritchotte’s essay with the education community. Access their article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through March 31, 2018.

Chin-Wen Lee

Jennifer Ritchotte

5 Ways to Provide Meaningful Experiences in the Classroom

Providing effective instruction is the key to supporting a student’s education. An important component of such instruction is the facilitation of engaging activities that will promote questioning and diverse conversations around subjects that are relatable to your students. The United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #4, which encourages quality education for all, promotes innovation and creativity. This goal can be advanced through your classrooms in five ways.

1. Collaboration

Organize collaborations amongst teachers and students on a weekly basis to foster a positive school environment. Grade team teachers can plan periods that are centered around whole group and small group instruction across the grade level. For example, dedicate a social studies period to joining three classes together for small group projects.

2. Peer-to-Peer Intervisitations

Following the path of collaboration, create differentiation of instruction through peer-to-peer intervisitations. The purpose of having students from one class visit students in another would be to pair students who have similar interests or strengths together and challenge them to develop their critical thinking skills. Guided reading groups would be a great channel for this because they can move at their own pace and be challenged through essential questions and inferring techniques.

3. Authentic Conversations

Commit to the SDG #4, quality education, by developing real connections to the students you teach and invest in. Individual conferences are valuable because the teacher becomes the learner. Students can teach the teacher about their culture through the labels that they add in their writing, their word choice, and the narratives that they share through the process of storytelling.

4. Professional Development

Work with other teachers during professional development to try out a new protocol that you are interested in using in your classroom or school. Fellow teachers can assist you in trying out a protocol prior to introducing it to your students. By sharing your ideas with colleagues, you can demonstrate your ideas and receive insightful feedback to make it better before presenting it to your students.

5. Social Media!

AAs members of Kappa Delta Pi, an organization that prides itself in promoting educational resources and successes, feel free to share your classroom activities on social media and celebrate your progress on meeting educational goals. This would support the SDGs, particularly within quality education, by sharing successful teaching experiences with educators across the world. If you are doing amazing work in the field of education, please share it with the UN using the twitter handle @GlobalGoalsUN and the hashtag #GlobalGoals. Have you found ways to reach out to friends, family, or colleagues about the success you have had with projects surrounding education? Please share below!

Happy Teaching,
Clairetza Felix

Clairetza Felix is a graduate student in the Literacy Specialist program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She chose to become a UN Youth Representative to be able to offer a unique approach to education.

A Framework for School Safety and Risk Management

This year’s holiday season marked the fifth anniversary of the deadly Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.

Since 2013, there have been at least 272 school shootings in the United States—about one per week, according to Everytown USA, a nonprofit organization that researches and reports on public gun violence. In 2017 alone, there were 64 shootings at schools and universities, with 31 of those resulting in injury or death.

As Everytown USA asks, how many more students will have to die before legislators pass common-sense laws to prevent gun violence and save lives?

Until that question is settled, teachers and administrators are on the front lines of protecting their schools from targeted shootings. In a new article published this month in The Educational Forum, school violence expert Ann Marie C. Lenhardt, professor of counseling and human services at Canisius College, reports on “A Framework for School Safety and Risk Management: Results from a Study of 18 Targeted School Shooters.”  With coauthors Lemuel W. Graham and Melissa L. Farrell, Lenhardt expands on the long-term study they first reported in the Forum in 2010.

According to the authors, although awareness of targeted school violence has increased in the last decade, school-based mental health services and resources with a framework for threat assessment and prevention are still largely absent. The authors’ current paper builds on their previous study of 15 cases of targeted school shooters between 1996 and 2005, which focused exclusively on school culture, peer/social dynamics, and disclosure of intentions. The new paper focuses on 18 premeditated cases (16 incidents) of targeted secondary school shooters between 1996 and 2012, using publicly available resources to look at the contextual root variables.

In their new paper, Lenhardt and her coauthors examined 22 indicators in three areas—individual factors and behaviors, family dynamics, and triggering events—and found that the higher the number of risk factors present, the greater the potential for violent acts.

According to the authors’ data, environmental factors within the family may play a key role in how an adolescent responds to stress. Results showed that 94% percent of the shooters had demonstrated a lack of resiliency or an inability to rebound from an unsatisfactory experience, hindrance, or insult. This lack of inner resolve or self-confidence, coupled with poor coping skills in 83% of the shooters, was the deadliest combination of indicators measured. In addition, 67% of the shooters felt alienated, had been bullied, or had issued a violent threat. Five indicators were present in 61% of cases: signs of depression, lack of empathy, poor anger management, intent to carry out threats, and a history of previous threats or attempted suicide. Most of the shooters (83%) had access to weapons in their homes.

The authors recommend that teachers and principals use the study’s indicators to identify students at risk of violent behavior, and then take these steps to preclude school shootings: enhance mental health services in schools, include threat-assessment services, and promote family engagement in services. Everytown USA points out that in addition to the heartbreaking losses from targeted homicides, affected schools experience a drop in student enrollment and a nearly 5% decline in surviving students’ standardized test scores.

Lenhardt and her coauthors note that all students who receive counseling support services can become more resilient and, as a result, will be more likely to achieve academic and life goals.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share Lenhardt, Graham, and Farrell’s research with the education community. Access their article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through January 31, 2018.