Celebrate 105 Years Today!

FD 2 1200Founders Day is a time to reflect on the great educators who came before us, the mentors and experiences that shape us today, and the innovators that will transform the profession in the years ahead.

For more than a century, our dedication to leadership, service, and scholarship has guided our focus in offering an innovative, diverse network of support to our members throughout their careers. Tuesday we celebrate 105 years as a catalyst for achievements of outstanding educators, teacher leaders, and experts in the field of education.

Join the celebration!

In honor of Founders Day, the KDP’s Former Presidents have joined forces to ignite the celebration with an opportunity to double your donation in support of Kappa Delta Pi.

Donations of $19.11 will be doubled until all matching funds are exhausted. What does this mean?

Every dollar raised empowers members to build on their careers, helping them become outstanding educators and encouraging their scholarly achievement.

Thanks to our following members for their contributions so far today (updated 10:01 p.m. EST 3/9/2016):

  • Chris B.
  • Demi B.
  • Nathan B.
  • Robin B.
  • Susan B.
  • Susannah B.
  • Tamara B.
  • Cori C.
  • Marilyn C.
  • Mary C.
  • Melissa C.
  • Thomas C.
  • Barbara D.
  • Harold D.
  • Laurie D.
  • Ruth D.
  • Wally D.
  • Melissa E.
  • Rachel E.
  • B. G.
  • Carl G.
  • Olivia G.
  • Jayne H.
  • Denisha J.
  • Kort J.
  • Shirley J.
  • Marcy K.
  • Pamela K.
  • John L.
  • Carol M.
  • Frank M.
  • Leana M.
  • Mary Kate M.
  • Peggy M.
  • Abdulkadir N.
  • Karen N.
  • Marilyn N.
  • Marquita N.
  • Anna O.
  • Laura P.
  • Rosemary P.
  • Janette R.
  • Jerry R.
  • June R.
  • Sally R.
  • Chapin S.
  • Clinton S.
  • Donna Gail S.
  • Erin S.
  • Erin S.
  • Faye S.
  • Lisa S.
  • Vicki S.
  • William S.
  • Kathy T.
  • Liliana T.
  • Sandra T.
  • Vicky T.
  • Dorothy V.
  • Martha V.
  • Ron W.
  • Nancy Y.
  • Sarah Z.
  • Anonymous (x4)

Give online today to have your gift DOUBLED with this Founders Day match initiative.

FD 3 1200

You’re Invited to Participate in Teach to Lead – NOLA

Teach-to-LeadAs you may know, Kappa Delta Pi is a supporting organization of the Teach to Lead initiative of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, ASCD, and the U.S. Department of Education. This initiative began to advance student outcomes by expanding opportunities for teacher leadership, particularly those that allow teachers to stay in the classroom.

We are pleased that Teach to Lead will now be hosting their seventh Teacher Leadership Summit in New Orleans, LA, on April 23–24, 2016.

At the Summits, educators from around the nation will work to collaborate, problem solve, and develop action plans to put their own teacher leadership ideas into action. Our hope is to attract the best teacher leadership ideas from exceptional educators across the country—which is where Kappa Delta Pi comes in.

As a member of Kappa Delta Pi, you are invited and encouraged to submit an actionable teacher leadership idea to be presented at this New Orleans Summit.

Teach to Lead does ask that you bring a team of up to 5 stakeholders—teachers, principals, administrators, school board members, and so on—to make the best progress at the Summit. At least one member of your team MUST be a practicing educator.

Summit Participants Must:

  • Have an actionable teacher leadership idea.
  • Have at least one practicing classroom educator on your team.
  • Commit to taking implementation steps following Summit participation.
  • Be available to attend the entire summit (Sat, April 23 at 8 a.m until Sun, April 24 at 12:30 p.m.).

Submitted Ideas Must:

  • Allow teachers to lead from the classroom.
  • Identify an area of need or target a specific problem.
  • Develop and implement approaches that address the need or solve the problem.
  • Utilize teachers’ professional experiences and expertise.
  • Promote collaborative work among stakeholders.
  • Seek to create systemic supports for teacher leadership.
  • Be viable in the local context and sustainable over time.
  • Be able to show measurable progress over time.

Successful Summit Project Examples

Idea submissions will be reviewed by a team of teachers. For those who receive an invitation to participate, registration, lodging for those traveling over 50 miles, and some meals are provided free of charge. You can submit an idea for the Summit regardless of where you live, but travel costs are not covered, so please keep that in mind when you apply.

The deadline for idea submissions for the New Orleans Summit is Monday, February 22, 2016 at 11:59pm ET. All idea submissions must be completed and submitted by this date and time.

Click here to submit your best teacher leadership idea.

The Teach to Lead team will notify you if your idea is accepted for attendance. Please contact the Teach to Lead educator engagement team with additional questions. Their contact information is below.

You’re Invited to Participate in Teach to Lead

As you may know, Kappa Delta Pi is a supporting organization of the Teach to Lead initiative of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, ASCD, and the U.S. Department of Education. This initiative began to advance student outcomes by expanding opportunities for teacher leadership, particularly those that allow teachers to stay in the classroom.

Teach to Lead Summit Baltimore

We are pleased that Teach to Lead will now be hosting their sixth Teacher Leadership Summit in Baltimore, MD, on February 13–14, 2015.

At the Summits, educators from around the nation will work to collaborate, problem solve, and develop action plans to put their own teacher leadership ideas into action. Our hope is to attract the best teacher leadership ideas from exceptional educators across the country—which is where Kappa Delta Pi comes in.

As a member of Kappa Delta Pi, you are invited and encouraged to submit an actionable teacher leadership idea to be presented at this Baltimore Summit.

Teach to Lead does ask that you bring a team of up to 5 stakeholders—teachers, principals, administrators, school board members, and so on—to make the best progress at the Summit. At least one member of your team MUST be a practicing educator.

Summit Participants Must:

  • Have an actionable teacher leadership idea.
  • Have at least one practicing classroom educator on your team.
  • Commit to taking implementation steps following Summit participation.
  • Be available to attend the entire summit (Sat, Feb 13 at 8 a.m until Sun, Feb 14 at 12:30 p.m.).

Submitted Ideas Must:

  • Allow teachers to lead from the classroom.
  • Identify an area of need or target a specific problem.
  • Develop and implement approaches that address the need or solve the problem.
  • Utilize teachers’ professional experiences and expertise.
  • Promote collaborative work among stakeholders.
  • Seek to create systemic supports for teacher leadership.
  • Be viable in the local context and sustainable over time.
  • Be able to show measurable progress over time.

Successful Summit Project Examples

Idea submissions will be reviewed by a team of teachers. For those who receive an invitation to participate, registration, lodging for those traveling over 50 miles, and some meals are provided free of charge. You can submit an idea for the Summit regardless of where you live, but travel costs are not covered, so please keep that in mind when you apply.

The deadline for idea submissions for the Baltimore Summit is December 13, 2015 at 11:59pm ET. All idea submissions must be completed and submitted by this date and time.

Click here to submit your best teacher leadership idea.

The Teach to Lead team will notify you if your idea is accepted for attendance by January 8, 2015. Please contact the Teach to Lead educator engagement team with additional questions. Their contact information is below.

Celebrate Family & Consumer Sciences Day by “Dining In!”

AAFCS_Day_Logo_2015ouKappa Delta Pi is a proud partner of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS), and we are celebrating Family & Consumer Sciences Day on December 3, 2015, alongside more than 100,000 other individuals, families, and organizations!

The event, themed “Dining In” for Healthy Families, was an ASAE Power of (A) 2015 Silver Award Winner. The chosen date honors AAFCS Founder Ellen Swallow Richards, the first female MIT graduate.

Carolyn W. Jackson, CFCS, AAFCS CEO, says “Family & Consumer Sciences Day calls attention to something simple families can do to be physically, mentally, and financially healthier—prepare and eat a nutritious meal together. We are proud to lead this important initiative.”

AAFCS and family and consumer science professionals have spent the past weeks educating students, families, government agencies, businesses, and other organizations on nutrition, healthy food preparation, and food safety with an overall focus on well-being, resources, and relationships.

kimhfsFamilies who eat a healthy meal, especially those who prepare the meal together, are shown to have stronger family communication and family traditions. Children develop life skills needed to live a healthier lifestyle, have a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables, and perform better schools.

The obesity epidemic is fueled by unhealthy eating patterns and a lack of food preparation knowledge. AAFCS uses Family & Consumer Sciences Day to highlight the benefits of healthful eating as a family.

Need meal ideas, motivation to eat healthy, or want to be part of the dining in movement? The official Family & Consumer Sciences Day website has all of the resources you need to participate in the day.

Help AAFCS meet their goal of 200,000 pledges! To join KDP in participating, sign the pledge and commit to preparing and eating one healthy meal with your family or friends; then share your commitment or a photo of your healthy mean with #FCSday and #healthyfamselfie on Facebook or Twitter.

Passion as an Adviser

Ms. Rosa Rodriguez is the yearbook adviserrosa-rodriguez at Sunset High School in Dallas. As we near the end of National Yearbook Week, we wanted to share her story and tips.

I sat alone in the large, dark auditorium waiting for the publications adviser session to begin. I had glanced at the agenda for the meeting at least twice. I could have memorized it had I looked at it again. It wasn’t that I felt bored just sitting there as minutes passed. It was the feeling you get when you know what to expect from an experience that has become like clockwork for a long time. It wasn’t long before I realized how much my experience as a high school publications adviser had been sewn into my life. It was as though sessions such as this one in the auditorium had become part of a routine, almost like a ritual. image3

Advising is an art. The craftsmanship of every single detail of advising takes years to perfect and it’s always evolving. Going into my second year teaching I was excited about finally teaching something related to my original career and college major. Following the housing crisis and economic troubles of 2008, I wanted to continue my journalist career but with a more meaningful twist. After a year teaching Spanish I finally found what I was looking for, but was I ready? No. But it only took a bit of willingness and and tons of passion.image1

The first year was not easy. I was expected to rebuild a program that was destined to dissolve.

Journalism and the Advanced Journalism yearbook and newspaper courses earned the label of dumping grounds from many teachers. The yearbook didn’t profit and its production process became a staff management nightmare. All plant deadlines were missed, pictures from previous years were used, people misquoted and misidentified, the list of classroom nightmares was endless. And there I was: a second-year teacher with plenty of love for journalism but no experience advising it. I organized the mess I inherited and quickly bonded with my students, creating a mutually respectful environment that was both fun and productive. By the end of the first semester we had completed half of the book but my hours proofing, editing and publishing pages were endless! By the end of the school year we made a profit of about $9,000, something that was unheard of in years. The demand to enroll in yearbook motivated me to design a staff application and seek talent that had a knack for art and design, excellent writing skills, proficient photography and others who simply had a driven personality and wanted to explore journalism. Our first yearbook camp group attended summer training that year.image4

Four years later I look back on all the routines, organization, structure, and long hours helping make these yearbooks possible. But they’re nothing more than that: just routines that your mind is trained for. It’s the abstract, what you can’t see that drives you into wanting to push these routines. You either have this force or you don’t have it. You’ll either make wonderful things happen or fail. Four years of UIL contests, awards, laughs, tears, travels and summer camps, celebrations and food, stress and plenty of long hours. I never continued pursuing opportunities as a journalist, but every time I see those young staff members looking through their yearbooks and once I publish that last page of the yearbook I never stop and wonder what if I had stayed in journalism? This is what I enjoy most and where I’m supposed to be.image2

 

Surviving the First Year and Success as an Adviser

  1. Find out your campus budget. You need to know how much money to start with and build upon for your yearbook.
  2. Find out who your publishing company is and connect with your sales rep.
  3. Find a professional photography studio. Get in touch with the sales rep for your individual pictures; coordinate photos.
  4. Design a syllabus to be a classroom management tool, and just like any class, outline your expectations and procedures.
  5. Create other documentation. Students should sign a contract, staff profile sheet, camera check out documents, and keep a staff manual (aka the staff Bible in which you list the staff, the pages they have been assigned and deadlines). Keep your Principal informed and provide him or her with manual that includes the policies on prior review and other guidelines outlined by you.
  6. Bond with your staff. You want these students to work for you and reach your standards. Advising is like coaching. It’s their yearbook but you are ultimately responsible for the behavior and results. You will want to build leaders and strong contributors for future leadership roles each year.
  7. Learn! Attend workshops, meet other advisers, communicate with your sales rep.
  8. Grow. Join a professional organization and have your students enter contests for team and individual awards.
  9. Stand out. Make staff Ids. I make them myself and have them laminated professionally. Design staff shirts, crate announcements, posters, and so on.
  10. Money guru. Stay on top of encumbrances and manage deposits and expenses.

Research from the Educational Forum: LGBT Educators and School Climate

tiffany-wrightToday’s blogger is Dr. Tiffany E. Wright, Assistant Professor at Millersville University in Millersville, Pennsylvania. She writes here to describe research published in an article (co-authored with Dr. Nancy J. Smith) in the current special issue of The Educational Forum on Sexuality, Gender, Identity, and Education. 

Research has found that an unsafe school climate created by discrimination of LGBT educators is damaging for not only the individual teacher, but the students as well.  How can educators provide the best possible education for their students if they do not feel safe or welcomed in their own classrooms? A safe school is described as one in which the school climate enables students, teachers, staff, and administrators to experience non-threatening and positive interactions while fostering and modeling healthy relationships and growth.  As school climate has been determined to be a main source of stress for LGBT educators, our research aimed to understand LGBT educators’ experiences in their school settings and to determine whether positive change has occurred.  By administering two surveys, one in 2007 and one in 2011, our research team was able to examine comparable changes in school climate related to LGBT faculty over a four-year time span. Both surveys collected similar data. This included how LGBT teachers perceived their workplace climate and the factors that influenced them to perceive this climate.

Sadly, the results of these studies showed that a lack of a safe climate persisted in schools over the time period studied. Participants from 2007 and 2011 shared experiences of being ignored or avoided, as well as hearing homophobic comments regularly from other teachers, parents, and even students. The highest percentage of demeaning language about LGBT identities was actually from students. These educators also experienced lack of support and intervention when faced with these situations. Although more policies existed in 2011 for addressing this negative language, they lacked enforcement. In both studies, more than two thirds of participants reported a lack of LGBT issues represented in the current curriculum and had experienced little to no professional development geared around LGBT issues.  Some participants were threatened with job loss, reassigned, denied promotion, or didn’t have their contracts renewed. As a result, it comes as no surprise that many LGBT educators still feared being out to their colleagues, students, and administrators. The most shocking data was found in the 2011 iteration of the survey. LGBT educators did not feel as comfortable supporting LGBT students as they did in 2007, which means fewer felt like they could be role models for a population of students who increasingly need that affirmation. However, for those LGBT educators who were out and accepted, they felt this made it possible for them to support LGBT students, as well as be better educators overall.

Our study confirms prior research that school leaders directly or indirectly have an important impact on the climate for LGBT educators. They influence and enforce policy, and they can create professional development opportunities that include training on diversity issues. Given the variety of challenges facing educators today, it is vital that school leaders support all teachers in their individual development. Making each teacher feel comfortable in the school is invaluable for helping teachers feel safe in providing the very best instruction and support to each student.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share this article free with the education community through October 31, 2015. Read the full article here.

October is Honor Your Counselor Month

Fall is my favorite season of the year.  The changing of the leaves, cooler temperatures that require hooded sweatshirts, and both football and the school year are in full swing.  These are things I am thankful for each October.

However, more than these things, I am thankful for the wonderful leaders in the field of education that I have the pleasure of working with each and every day.KDP Counselor Thank You

Each biennium at KDP, we set aside the weeks leading up to Convocation as Honor Your Counselor Month.

Please join us in recognizing and thanking your Chapter Counselor(s) for the work they do in supporting and advising your KDP chapter by participating in our “We Couldn’t BEE More Thankful!” program:

  • By donating to KDP in honor of your Counselor, you will purchase your counselor a $5 Starbucks Gift Card and support our Counselor appreciation efforts, (including light snacks and a special Counselor room at Convo 2015 in Orlando, Florida).

We look forward to partnering with you to show our dedicated, volunteer Counselors how much we appreciate all they do for our individual KDP chapters and also the entire Society.

From all of us here at Headquarters, thank you!

Note:  If a donation isn’t an option right now, check out the list of other ideas to Honor Your Counselor posted here.

  Chapin Schnick

Chapin Schnick is Northeast Regional Chapter Coordinator at Kappa Delta Pi.