7 Resources for Teachers to Change a Racism Narrative

As one of the articles we are sharing describes, racism is alive and well in America.

In your classrooms, whether in-person or virtual, you have a responsibility to ensure all children receive an equitable education.

We’ve compiled 7 resources for you from our magazines, The Teacher Advocate and the KDP Record, to help you address racism and racial inequity in your classrooms and communities.

We’re All in This Together: Four Tips for a Culturally Responsive Learning Environment

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Author: Marquita S. Hockaday (@KeeKeeHockaday), Assistant Professor of Education at Pfeiffer University

Today’s classrooms are even more diverse, mirroring the changes in American society. More than half of the students in these classrooms are culturally and linguistically diverse. They need culturally responsive instruction that allows them to recognize and understand their own culture, while building knowledge from that cultural base. These four tips will help you create and maintain a culturally responsive learning environment in your classroom.

Teaching in an Increasingly Polarized Society

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Author: Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, Charles Howard Candler Professor Emeritus at Emory University; she is a 2015 KDP Laureate Inductee

Our democracy and equal opportunity for all students are endangered as schools become increasingly polarized. Dr. Jacqueline Jordan Irvine calls for better-prepared and more committed teachers in the areas of social justice and culturally responsive pedagogy.

Racism is Alive and Well in America

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Author: Joyce Lynn Garrett, Teacher and Administrator in the public schools and higher education for 35 years

“A recent event from my own experience provided the impetus for this column,” writes author Joyce Lynn Garrett. “At a social gathering, someone used a racial slur to describe President Obama. After I made it clear I was offended by the comment, I left immediately.” Read more of Joyce’s story and find three areas she recommends teachers address in the fight against intolerance.

Broadening Our Approach to Educating Children in Poverty

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Author: Pedro Noguera (@PedroANoguera), Distinguished Professor of Education at the Graduate School of Education at UCLA; he is a 2011 KDP Laureate Inductee

 

New York City leaders have embraced a holistic vision of school reform that begins to confront the race and class disparities in learning opportunities for poor children that most other cities neglect. Though their plan for high-quality, full-service schools goes against the current tide of market-based reform, research has shown that these schools can have a major impact on the academic and social outcomes of children.

Failed Citizenship, Civic Engagement, and Education

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Author: James A. Banks (@DrJamesABanks1), Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and Director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle; he is a 1997 KDP Laureate Inductee

Many racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and religious groups are denied  structural inclusion into their nation-state. Consequently, they do not internalize the values and symbols of the nation-state, develop a strong identity with it, or acquire political efficacy. The author conceptualizes this process as “failed citizenship,” compares and contrasts it with “successful citizenship,” and describes the role of schools in reducing failed citizenship and helping marginalized groups become successful and efficacious citizens in multicultural nation-states.

Fighting to Be Heard

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Author: Tracey Flores (@traceyhabla), Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Austin

“On an evening in June, four Latina girls entering ninth and tenth grade, along with their mothers and fathers, gathered at [my] university for an evening of drawing, writing, and sharing. Sitting side-by-side at tables, girls and their parents busily sketched, in pencil and crayon, a drawing in response to the question, De dónde eres? (Where are you from?).” Read more of Tracey’s story by downloading the article.

Hiding in Plain Sight: Understanding and Addressing Whiteness and Color-Blind Ideology in Education

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Author: David Gillborn, Professor of Critical Race Studies and Director of the Centre for Research in Race and Education at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom; he is a 2015 KDP Laureate Inductee

Dr. David Gillborn argues that color-blind ideology amounts to a refusal to deal with the reality of racism, which protects and extends White racial advantage, as well as shares thoughts on dismantling Whiteness in education.

BONUS: Intro to Social Justice Course

We live in a diversifying democracy—one that (at least in theory) is built upon the values of the dignity of all people, equal opportunity, and justice. But a quick glance at headlines tells us that, despite the progress made, we have a way to go. To close the gap between our democratic vision and reality, citizens (and educators) need to develop skills in citizenship and democracy.

The KDP University Intro to Social Justice Course introduces the notion of social justice and guides teachers in the development of awareness and skills needed to reframe lessons and units to have a social justice lens.

Enroll in the course for FREE by DMing us on Instagram (@KappaDeltaPi) or Twitter (@KappaDeltaPi) or by emailing us at marketing@kdp.org and simply request the Social Justice Course code.

Truth Talk: Conversations About Race

Khasnabis

Dr. Debi Khasnabis

Today’s bloggers are Debi Khasnabis and Simona Goldin, who co-authored with Ebony Perouse-Harvey and Margaret O. Hanna to write “Race and the Mona Lisa: Reflecting on Antiracist Teaching Practice,” which appears in the latest issue of The Educational Forum.

Race permeates every thread of the fabric of society in the United States, regardless of whether we recognize and speak to it.

Simona Goldin

Dr. Simona Goldin

This truth is stitched throughout all aspects of public schooling, from the gaps in academic learning opportunities that children of color experience relative to their White peers, to the racial marginalization of children at recess. This truth weakens the fabric of the institution of schooling.

As teacher–educators, we support beginning teachers in seeing and responding to the ways that race pervades children’s experiences in classrooms.

In doing so we help them leverage the knowledge that children of color and their families bring to their work in schools as well as repair the rips in the social compact.

Our current research, highlighted in “Race and the Mona Lisa: Reflecting on Antiracist Teaching Practice” in this issue of The Educational Forum, is inspired by our awareness that children’s full sets of knowledge are often unseen in schools. Children of color, especially, are unlikely to be seen for their knowledge. This invisibility occurs in instructional moments when that knowledge is related to students’ racial or ethnic identity.

What does it look like when children’s knowledge is made invisible? 

A common refrain heard in schools is “That’s racist!”

Digging into this, we were initially surprised to learn what young children identify as “racist.”

When children are raised to be “colorblind,” they can think that referring to people by their racial identifiers is racist.

What are the effects of this? From Black colleagues, we learned that their race-conscious children who had been raised to recognize, discuss, and analyze race and its associated qualities were silenced by their peers and teachers in discussions of race.

One colleague’s son, after referring to a Black person as “Black,” was hushed by a peer and told “That’s racist!” This also occurs in instructional interactions when children of color speak about race and racism. When they are silenced, what becomes invisible is their racial literacy and fluency, their advanced and sophisticated knowledge.

More than just students blister at direct discussions of race in classrooms. Teachers also frequently steer clear of discussions having to do with race.

A teacher candidate once consulted with Debi after two Black students in her science class critiqued a Bill Nye video as racist.

The students’ critique rested on their judgment that the film featured fewer people of color than White people. The teacher candidate expressed trepidation about how to handle this accusation, especially as she saw nothing “blatantly racist” in the film. She wondered how she could convey to the students that their critique was inappropriate.

These everyday occurrences affect the health and vibrancy of classrooms.

In addition to silencing students, they fail to leverage and mine the racial fluency and expertise that some students, especially students of color, can bring. Further, students whose racial fluency is undeveloped lose out on critical opportunities to speak directly about race and racism, to practice having substantive discussions about inequality, and to construct, together, a pluralistic society.

We argue teachers should model interest and engagement in the child’s thinking. When students use racial identifiers, teachers should perk up, as this is a sign that their students are bringing reservoirs of knowledge about race to this discussion. This knowledge is a rare and precious resource.

When students launch racialized critiques, this shows their teachers that they have reservoirs of knowledge about oppression.

Recognizing students’ reservoirs of racial knowledge for what they are—assets to be built upon for learning—is in the interest of the child and the learning community.

When we silence these discussions, we uphold normative ways of being that support White supremacy.

Simona Goldin teaches courses pertaining to the sociology, history, and policy of schooling in the U.S. She conducts research on ways to transform the preparation of beginning teachers to help them teach in more equitable ways and has elaborated the teaching practices that bridge children’s work in schools on academic content with their home and community-based experiences. 

Debi Khasnabis is a clinical associate professor of education and the chair of elementary teacher education at the University of Michigan School of Education. She teaches courses focusing on multicultural and multilingual education and conducts research on pedagogies of teacher education that support the development of culturally responsive teaching and understandings of inequality in schools.