Teaching Literacy From The CORE

Ms. Beckee walked into her very first classroom eager to teach her students to love reading and writing.

She strongly believed literacy is transformational for student success.

Ms. Beckee knew she had a big job ahead of her, though. The school where she worked had had low test scores in reading for the past several years, most of her students were labeled as “at-risk,” and she would have a limited classroom library. What Ms. Beckee wasn’t expecting, however, was the difficulty she would face in reaching students who came from backgrounds unlike her own. She began to ask herself, “How do I reclaim and sustain transformational literacy practices so that my students are successful, lifelong lovers of reading and writing?”

Situations like the one Ms. Beckee faced are quite common.

With the increasingly diverse makeup of students, pressures of standardized testing, and lack of funding, teachers often feel overwhelmed with the task of transforming their students into strong readers and writers.

Although this task does take time, mystery doesn’t have to surround it, and fear doesn’t have to drive it. Being a strong literacy teacher requires a lot of skill and a lot of heart (Freire, 2000). But it’s easy to lose heart when testing, pressure, and fear take over.

What I offer here is an invitation to examine your core and ground your knowledge and skills of teaching literacy in your heart.

The Framework

What I refer to as the CORE of your pedagogy are the four concepts to consider when reclaiming and sustaining transformational literacy practices. They are as follows:

C – Cultivate sociological mindfulness.

O – Operate from a critical social justice mindset.

R – Reframe learning as equity and excellence.

E – Exercise self-care.

These concepts are not linear, but looping in nature. This means that you don’t need to perfect one before you can move on to the next. Think of each concept as interrelated, both independent of and dependent on one another.

Cultivate sociological mindfulness.

Being sociologically mindful calls for awareness of the present, how the present has been affected by the past, and how the decisions you make now could affect the future (Schwalbe, 2017). This means paying attention and posing critical questions: What do you know; what do you think you know; and what don’t you know about your students? Ask yourself:

  • What are the experiences this student brings into the classroom every day?
  • How does my understanding of these experiences affect how I teach?
  • Why do the experiences of others matter?

Operate from a critical social justice mindset.

A critical social justice mindset for literacy “is an evolving process where teachers and students always consider cultural relevancy, employ critical literacy, and work for social justice as they relate to the word and the world” (Stachowiak, 2016). Ask yourself:

  • Whose voice is included in this read-aloud? In this decision making? In this literacy lesson?
  • Do the books I have in my classroom library reflect the diversity of the world, without harmful stereotypes and biases?
  • How can the lessons I teach continue to affect my students when they leave my classroom?

Reframe learning as equity and excellence.

Equity is about giving people what they need to be successful. When we reframe our literacy practices with this in mind, we shift to a true focus on individual student excellence. Excellence is about creating transformational spaces for learners to recognize humanity, engage in critical dialogue with their peers, and reflect. Ask yourself:

  • What does this student need to be successful? Who could I ask for support?
  • Does every student have access to information that would benefit them the most?
  • Are the resources I give my students equitable?

Exercise self-care.

As teachers, it is in our nature to take care of others and, in doing so, it’s easy for us to forget about taking care of ourselves. But self-care is an incredibly important and necessary part of being a great teacher. Make sure to put a self-care activity on your calendar weekly—and commit to it. Some examples of self-care include:

  • going to your favorite kickboxing class at the gym (kick that stress out!);
  • engaging in a sitting, walking, or eating meditation; and
  • practicing self-compassion: Forgive yourself, take sick leave when you’re sick, set boundaries.

Putting CORE Into Action

Teaching literacy from the CORE begins with making a commitment to critically reflect on the abovementioned questions. This self and classroom inventory will pave the way to transformational and sustainable literacy practices!

Dr. StachowiakDr. Stachowiak is an Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of North Carolina Wilmington and a literacy consultant with The Educator Collaborative. Her interests are in literacy curriculum, equity literacy, and gender issues in education.

Recommended Websites

Recommended Readings

  • Culturally Affirming Literacy Practices for Urban Elementary Students, edited by Lakia M. Scott & Barbara Purdum-Cassidy
  • Reading, Writing, and Rising Up: Teaching About Social Justice and the Power of the Written Word, by Linda Christensen

References

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic.

Schwalbe, M. (2017). The sociologically examined life: Pieces of the conversation (5th ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Stachowiak, D. M. (2016). A framework for critical social justice literacy in urban elementary schools. In L. M. Scott & B. Purdum-Cassidy (Eds.), Culturally affirming literacy practices for urban elementary students (pp. 13–26). Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield.

4 Steps To Engage Students In The Close Reading Process

CloseReading

You know that close reading is important and necessary due to Common Core mandates, but do you feel uncomfortable when it is time to teach close reading and implement close reading strategies with your students?

Does your current mode of instruction leave your students disengaged and uninterested in reading?

What can you do to change the current atmosphere in your classroom regarding close reading and close reading strategies?

With the adoption of the Common Core Standards, teachers were pushed to incorporate close reading into their curriculum (Dollins, 2016). It sent teachers into a frenzy to find ways of promoting close reading within their classrooms. Close reading is defined as uncovering layers of meaning that lead to deep comprehension of complex text (Boyles, 2014). But how does one effectively do this? One way is by using close reading strategies—concepts that help students actively think about close reading in a formulaic manner.

Figuring out which strategies are the most effective in engaging students while allowing them to deeply comprehend the selected course reading is a daunting task for a newer teacher. However, you can do four things to ensure that your students get the most out of the close reading process.

1. Choose interesting and culturally relevant text.

Choose text and passages that are interesting to your students. When students find no interest or relevance in the text, they will be disengaged and uninterested. Choose texts that are age appropriate, intellectually stimulating, and culturally relevant. When books contain characters or situations that are representative of students, children are more likely to remain engaged and show curiosity (May, Bingham, & Pendergast, 2014).

2. Use graphic organizers.

Graphic organizers encourage your students to engage with complex text by organizing key ideas from the reading (Flynt & Cooter, 2005; Singleton & Filce, 2015). Foldable graphic organizers are interactive and will keep kinesthetic learners engaged as they fill in important information from the text.

3. Read the text in different methods.

Students should not sit and read independently as the only form of reading. Chunk the text into smaller, shorter passages, depending on the length of the text. Then, allow students to read with a partner, read with a whole group, read independently, or listen to audiobooks. You can even read aloud to your students. Use all methods in a balanced manner, being sure that students do not become fatigued from reading and shut down.

4. Discuss.

What’s the point in reading literature if there’s no discussion? Give students the opportunity to share their learning, discuss opinions, make predictions, and share alternate endings for the text. After engaging in the close reading of a text, the best way to encourage engagement and interest is to allow students to share their ideas about a text.

Today’s classroom teachers don’t have the luxury of simply assigning text and allowing students to self-monitor for comprehension.

When expecting students to closely read a text, teachers must be hands-on throughout the close reading process, especially to ensure engagement with, foster interest in, and allow students to derive meaning from the text. There’s no need for the frenzy of trying to figure out how to promote close reading in the classroom. Implement these simple close reading strategies for stress-free, engaged, and interesting close reading throughout your class.

Image result for sharonica nelson university of alabama birmingham Dr. Nelson is a Visiting Assistant Professor of English/ Language Arts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research interests include urban education, writing instruction, and close reading.

References

Boyles, N. (2014). Close reading without tears. Educational Leadership, 72(1), 32–37.

Dollins, C. A. (2016). Crafting creative nonfiction: From close reading to close writing. The Reading Teacher, 70(1), 49–58. https://doi.org/10.1002/trtr.1465

Flynt, E. S., & Cooter Jr., R. B. (2005). Improving middle-grades reading in urban schools: The Memphis Comprehension Framework. Reading Teacher, 58(8), 774–780.

May, L. A., Bingham, G. E., & Pendergast, M. L. (2014). Culturally and linguistically relevant readalouds. Multicultural Perspectives, 16(4), 210–218. https://doi.org/10.1080/15210960.2014.952299

Singleton, S. M., & Filce, H. G. (2015). Graphic organizers for secondary students with learning disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 48(2), 110–117. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059915605799

Teaching Literacy through Public Health: Focus on Children, Grades 4 and Above

Why with an already brimming agenda of topics and content, would a teacher use project-based public health literacy as the theme of a class project?

What is meant by public health anyway?

How would it fit into a classroom?

Public health is the term used to describe how a state or national government regulates, monitors, and promotes the well-being of its citizens. One Public Health is a 21st-century term defining a global public health approach to prevent disease and promote health and health services.

Although these issues are obviously pertinent to students, how can a teacher motivate students to public health? Focus on mothers and children.

Here’s how to start:

  1. Print short excerpts (or use digital media) that deal with children and maternal health that are relatable to children.
  2. Ask children how long their life expectancy is in the United States versus if they were born in an underdeveloped African nation? Have them guess and explain numbers. Next, allow them to research the potential life expectancies based on birth country.
  3. Have them reflect on how life expectancy varies according to country of birth. Allow them to react in discussion, poetry, illustration or comics, and written reflections.
  4. Challenge them with the larger issue of how an individual country can extend its life expectancy numbers. Focus them on public health mandates which they as children need to adhere to in order to be admitted into school. Be grade 4, they should be familiar with immunization at the very least.
  5. Challenge the students to list other maternal health issues that would affect a baby’s survival and other environment issues that might be toxic for a baby.
  6. Allow them to research child mortality and maternal health factors that can alter a child’s life expectancy. Share the two-page excerpt of Rakku’s story and contrast it with the animation about the joyous birth of baby Maya. One mother in a narrative based on a very true story that takes place routinely in underdeveloped countries, suffers the horrific and preventable death of her beloved son. In the optimistic, beautifully presented animation, another fictive mother (but also based on real cases unfolding in undeveloped countries) delights in hearing the healthy cry of her baby girl at her birth. Two stories and both can be true ones.
  7. Challenge children to come up with the root cause of the death of Rakku’s beloved son. Sadly, in the short two-page excerpt of this baby’s brief struggle, myriad causes emerge that explicate this untimely fate that in this 21st century is all too common in underdeveloped countries. First, although Rakku was a working mother, she was unable, even with the help of her 7-year-old son, to have sufficient income to properly nourish herself and her children much less to produce breast milk for her baby. The baby developed diarrhea, which in developed countries does not kill babies. After trying traditional healer remedies, Rakku had to sell off property to pay for a bus to take him to the hospital because he was limp and thin. The doctor scolded her for waiting too long and a nurse urged better nutrition and hygiene. But after being discharged from the hospital with an infusion of glucose and prescriptions, the baby died. Like an Agatha Christie mystery turned horrifically true, there are numerous causative factors to blame in the baby’s death from diarrhea and dehydration. End of day, the cause is a social determinant: poverty. Had that determinant not been in place, Rakku, a working mother of three who truly wanted to nourish her baby, could have used her wages from her labor to purchase nutrients that would have allowed her to provide sustenance for her family including the baby. When the baby was ill, she might have been able to pay for a local trained health worker to examine the baby or to pay for the bus to get quickly to the hospital to have a certified doctor examine the baby.
  8. Challenge students to explain how and why the Baby Maya animation has a joyous ending because of different access to public health. Have them explain why the ending is different.
  9. Challenge students to identify career roles and government regulations that could be put in place to change future mother Rakku stories, so they too could end with a healthy childbirth. Students may also want to study child mortality and maternal care issues in the United States and report on how a public health focus can improve those as well.

Any and all of these child- and mother-centered public health topics will immerse students in literacy research, discussion, personal development as an empathetic citizen, mathematics data analysis, 21st-century problem solving, engineering design process, and introduction to public health careers. Students can immediately develop project-based life expectancy learning on expo displays in their schools, online sites with their perspectives and that of their families, blogs on public health and child-focused news issues, podcasts with public health professionals, and more.

Beyond accountable literacy skills, public health issues alert students to the ways their skills can set them off on the open and needed role of caring for the key health futures of all. Teaching for citizenship and real world participation is the essence of education.

Dr. Rose Reissman is a veteran teacher educator who founded the Writing Institute now in 157 elementary schools nationwide. She is coauthor of Project-Based Literacy: Fun Literacy Projects for Powerful Common Core Learning (Information Age Publishing, 2016).

Resources

Hey World, “We’re All Wonders”

Tapping in to Literacy Along With Some Tolerance and Respect

Frequently, books and films in popular culture and Hollywood spill over into the classroom, creating opportunities for conversations that might not otherwise happen. The 2012 book Wonder, written by R. J. Palacio, followed by the 2017 picture book We’re All Wonders, and the 2017 film adaptation are no exception. The story centers on a boy, Auggie, who was born with facial disfigurations from Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS).

This story, in the tradition of Dr. Seuss stories, engages all ages and therefore is relevant to the K–12 classroom. Given that it illustrates the worst and the best in people, the story provides opportunities for classroom learning and lessons on empathy. Wonder is perfect for counselors, and educators in family literacy, visual art, and reading at all levels.

Here are ways you can leverage the power of Wonder in your classroom.

Set up the message. Before exploring the narrative or the picture book, have students anticipate the story from the title. Talk about the word “wonder” and try to draw a picture of this word. Ask whether it is good to be “a wonder.” Children can discuss what it means to be “ordinary.” Would they choose to be “ordinary” or “different”? During read-aloud time, have students share how they react to insults or even whether they themselves talk about others, make gestures, or use expressions that hurt others’ feelings. Challenge younger children to draw and to talk about or share how they might “escape” being mocked. After the story, ask the children to draw or write a story about how they might “look with kindness … and find wonder.”

Discuss how illustrations can convey emotions. Early childhood teachers can explore how Palacio uses line art and painting to convey the “wonder” status of a “different” Auggie. Full-page illustrations in We’re All Wonders portray snapshots of Auggie’s life, doing ordinary things like riding his bicycle, eating ice cream, and playing ball. Small thumbnail portraits show the other kids who are different from him—and each other. A two-page spread, which features Auggie and his dog Daisy facing the ground because they are devastated by the looks and comments of other kids, conveys Auggie’s emotional pain. Another spread shows Auggie escaping ridicule by putting on his helmet and blasting off to Pluto to chat with other single-eyed beings, and demonstrating ways individuals retreat from insults. The illustrations show the power of imagination to overcome negativity. Palacio’s message, “The Earth is big enough for all kinds of people,” is universally communicated by the illustration of Auggie with his back to the reader gazing at a vast shining Earth from a galaxy perspective.

Focus on Auggie’s just right narrative voice. For early childhood teachers, use story hour to share the picture book illustrating Auggie wearing his helmet. Palacio crafts Auggie’s voice to the appropriate K–3 register. The take-away message is that, despite his youth, Auggie is aware that he is different and that others make fun of his differences. For his taunting peers, the word “wonder” is a negative. Auggie wants them to focus on their own differences. Were they to do that, they would include him as an integral part of their world of differences because everyone is different from others. Palacio has poignantly tapped the rich emotional core of Auggie’s message to the unfeeling universe of so-called normal adults and children.

Explore the concept of genre. For middle school students and beyond, Wonder offers a unique opportunity to reconnect them with a favorite book from their childhood. Challenge students to share a favorite picture book from when they were young and detail how picture books differ from the young adult and juvenile literature they now read. Have students anticipate how Palacio might reframe the story in various genres, including picture books. Once students anticipate the themes and images, have them review the work and compare their ideas with the print story. Explain how Palacio, an illustrator and author, decided to tell her Auggie story through the picture story book genre. Ask students whether they prefer the middle school level book Wonder or the picture book version, and have them explain why. Families and students in class can also sample read-alouds of the work: bit.ly/Wonder-ReadAloud or bit.ly/Wonder-ReadAloud2. These resources can inspire students to create their own read-alouds, including public domain music and special effects.

These are just a few ways you can use Wonder in your classroom. A powerful message with a hero who has fascinated millions of readers—and viewers—can transcend age and genre to touch a larger audience. Palacio has used “wonder” to change the way readers of all ages “picture” the wonders within themselves. Readers of every age can benefit from this recognition and bring a little bit more nice “wonder” into the world. How will you bring “wonder” into your classroom?

Dr. Rose Reissman is a veteran teacher educator who founded the Writing Institute now in 157 elementary schools nationwide. She is coauthor of Project-Based Literacy: Fun Literacy Projects for Powerful Common Core Learning (Information Age Publishing, 2016).

Every Student Succeeds Act: Early Childhood Education

This is part of a series of blog posts by the KDP Public Policy Committee that examine the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA), a law that outlines the federal government’s role in education. The purpose of the series is to educate KDP members about this important law and its impact on their work as educators.

The ESSA Act requires documentation of “the strategies that the school will be implementing to address school needs, including a description of how such strategies will . . . address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of those at risk of not meeting the challenging State academic standards, through activities which may include . . . strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs” (pp. 68–69).

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” –Benjamin Franklin

The Every Student Succeeds Act reaffirms the country’s commitment to young learners. Although some research indicates that the kindergarten readiness achievement gap is lessening between children from low- and high-income families, the importance of preparing preschoolers for kindergarten remains a top priority for teachers and parents across the nation. ESSA acknowledges the need for high-quality preschool programs, outlines funding allotments and guidelines, and highlights the benefit of a smooth transition for preschoolers into kindergarten. Read more about the Early Learning Initiatives here.

According to ESSA Section 1114, if Title I funds are used to support preschool programs, then the school district plans must include a description of how the funding is used, specifically addressing how the district supports the transition from preschool to kindergarten. Also, the preschool program and/or services must comply with the performance standards laid out in the Head Start Act.

Vertical Alignment and Collaboration

Vertical alignment is an idea that most educators are familiar with: First-grade teachers share expectations with kindergarten teachers, second-grade teachers discuss what students should know by August with first-grade teachers, and so on. ESSA requires communication and collaboration between preschool programs and the school district. The focus on improving kindergarten readiness and supporting the preschool to kindergarten transition is a key point of the legislation. The idea is multi-faceted and holds many potential benefits, including:

  • Identifying and minimizing gaps in student learning by increasing communication between preschool and kindergarten teachers.
  • Increasing parent involvement and advocacy for their child by helping them to understand the transition.
  • Supporting students’ academic, emotional, and social needs as they transition.

Kindergarten Transition

The transition into kindergarten can be a tough one for children, parents, and sometimes teachers. Students enter kindergarten with so many varied experiences—some have been in daycare and preschool their whole life, and some have never been separated from a parent or family member. Many enter with knowledge of the alphabet and numbers, but there are also children who have never had any instruction or exposure to academic subjects. Regardless of background experiences, even simply learning to line up and sit down when asked can be a struggle.

Here are some ways to support the transition for students into kindergarten:

  • Connect preschool families with free book programs (like Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Program or visit Reading Rockets for more options) to engage kids with books.
  • Set up transition meetings with the preschool and kindergarten teachers, and support staff like counselors and nurses, to answer questions and establish expectations for families.
  • Establish a way for student preschool records to precede the student, giving the kindergarten teacher a running start at knowing academic (and sometimes social) needs before the school year begins.
  • Provide training for preschool teachers, kindergarten teachers, and support personnel on social and emotional needs specific to this transition.
  • Arrange kindergarten “play dates” over the summer for incoming kindergarteners and families to meet teachers, administration, support staff, and other kindergarteners.
  • Partner with local businesses and foundations to put together summer learning kits with crayons, paper, books, and other school supplies for the incoming kindergarteners to use over the summer.
  • Write and distribute a Tips for Families packet with helpful hints for parents and family members as they support their child through this transition.

Call to Action

Join this week’s ESSA discussion on KDP Global about these questions:

  • What do you or your district staff do to support the preschool to kindergarten transition?
  • In your experience, what are other potential benefits of supporting this transition?

Resources

Bassok, D., Finch, J. E., Lee, R., Reardon, S. F., & Waldfogel, J. (2016). Socioeconomic gaps in early childhood experiences: 1998 to 2010. AERA Open, 2(3), 1–22.

Reardon, S. F., & Portilla, X. A. (2016). Recent trends in income, racial, and ethnic school readiness gaps at kindergarten entry. AERA Open, 2(3), 1–18.

Ridzi, F., Sylvia, M., Qiao, X., & Craig, J. (2017). The Imagination Library Program and kindergarten readiness: Evaluating the impact of monthly book distribution. Journal of Applied Social Science, 11(1), 11–24.

Dr. Caroline Courter, NBCT, is a Curriculum Specialist at Age of Learning, Inc. and an adjunct faculty member in the Watson College of Education at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She is a member of the Kappa Delta Pi Policy Committee.

 

Operation Literacy Engaging Everyone

We don’t know his name, or that of his older sister, but we were still moved when he exclaimed, “I love Dr. Seuss! Daddy can I take this one?”

chapman-literacy1We glanced at one another excitedly as the boy clumsily pulled the Seuss work out of the book station we had just inaugurated. His sister found one, too, and was proud to be like her brother, book held high above her head.

Smiling, his father asked him which books he was going to bring back for other kids to take.

As they walked away hand in hand, the boy, his sister, and their father continued their conversation about books, and about reading. We were filled with a sense of gratitude for a moment that brought our vision of free neighborhood book stations to life.

These seemingly unplanned moments where learning connects families, communities, and each of us to a deeper self are what we live for as educators and future educators.

This year’s Literacy Alive! project brought many such moments to the members of Chapman’s Chi Beta Chapter.

Each year, the chapters of Kappa Delta Pi connect around a national literacy campaign called Literacy Alive! to “create programs and events in their communities that bring empowering literacy skills to their participants.” This year, more than 150 projects were submitted nationally, adding up to 57,052 people served and 44,625 books collected for distribution. As a chapter, Chi Beta was recognized for its partnership with a local initiative: Operation Literacy Engaging Everyone (Operation L.E.E.) in Anaheim, California.

Operation L.E.E.’s Facebook page reads, “We are a group of community members out to promote literacy and spread the love of reading in our community by providing book stations with free books.” The book stations are located at various homes and businesses in Anaheim, and represent a true community effort. A vision of local educators, the book stations are filled with donated books that anyone can borrow or take or donate. Operation L.E.E. started with five book stations and hopes to increase that number throughout Anaheim and in other interested cities.

chapman-literacy2Our first adventure with Operation L.E.E. was at the South Junior High School Service Day, where Chapman’s KDP members were tutored in making book stations by students. The amazing woodshop teacher, Chapman alumnus Matthew Bidwell, guided us around the classroom while seventh and eighth graders made assistants of us and demonstrated their mastery of carpentry. It was a fun and exciting day of building book stations from instructions, wood, and know-how.

As future educators, we talked about how it reminded us that our students will always be our greatest teachers, and that our classrooms can be spaces for doing good.

chapman-literacy3We also helped sort more than 500 donated books, prompting a recognition of our community’s generosity and spirit.

As book donations rolled in they were collected at the home of Operation L.E.E. leader, Juan Alvarez. A local educator and parent, Juan welcomed a collaboration with Chapman, and KDP members helped distribute books to book stations around Anaheim. Juan also welcomed us to his home, where we hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Operation L.E.E. at the location of the first official book station.

chapman-literacy4Here, Operation L.E.E. was presented with congressional recognition from Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez, and the book stations officially went live!

In recognition of the success of Operation L.E.E., KDP awarded Chapman’s Chi Beta Chapter with a Silver Award.

chapman-literacy5As the project continues to grow, you can help by donating books, providing funds or materials to build more book stations, or volunteering to host a book station at your home or business (contact operationleeoc@gmail.com).

It was exciting for us to help support local educators who are moving beyond their classrooms to make an even greater impact in their community. And we were able to practice engaged citizenship by helping local educators bring a model program into fruition.

In addition to strengthening our relationship with one of our partner districts in Anaheim, we also developed new partnerships with other collaborating organizations such as Los Amigos de Orange County and the Anaheim Public Library.

chapman-literacy6Toward the end of the ribbon-cutting ceremony, we had our serendipitous visitors, our first book station patrons, and they knew exactly what to do. For us, it was like watching from a distance—watching our efforts and those of the community sprout into an opportunity.

For the father and his children, it was a seemingly spontaneous moment to talk about reading.

But we saw meaning in our project and could envision many such moments happening at this book station and at others around the city. Operation L.E.E. had come to life, and Chapman’s Kappa Delta Pi chapter helped make it happen.

Guest author Anat Herzog is an educator who has a deep love for her students and their families. She is a doctoral candidate at Chapman University and Literacy Alive! Coordinator for the Chi Beta Chapter of KDP. Her eventual goal is to open a school based on the pedagogical principles of John Dewey and Paulo Freire.

Today’s Math Fact

Katie Heath is Northeast Regional Chapter Coordinator at Kappa Delta Pi.

Today's Math FactIt’s no question that math facts must be mastered as a foundation for most mathematical principles. Here’s a math fact you may not be familiar with:

Kappa Delta Pi supports our practicing teachers through the Literacy Alive! Professional Member Division by providing stipends to teachers who host literacy projects in their school or community.

Last year, through the partnership with educators like you, the Literacy Alive! Professional Member Division impacted more than 1,700 students and 2,900 parents across seven states. We are hoping to expand this influence this year and are currently accepting stipend requests.

For more information and to submit your Professional Member Stipend Request form, visit the KDP website.