Share Your #WhyITeach

Teacher Appreciation Week is quickly approaching—what a great time to share with the world why you’re proud to be a teacher!

KDP is looking to feature stories, photos, videos, and more, from teachers like you; we love a Celebration of Teaching!

We want to see and hear about your classroom experiences, mentors, lives you’ve touched, and what keeps you inspired in your work.

So, we’ve launched a contest that runs through Tuesday, April 30, with winners announced by early May.

1 Grand Prize Winner Will Be Chosen

  • $1,000 check
  • Story featured in the New Teacher Advocate
  • Free Convo registration
  • Story featured on blog and in email during National Teacher Week (5/6-5/10)

4 Runner-Up Prize Winners Will Be Chosen

  • $250 check
  • Story featured on blog during National Teacher Week (5/6-5/10)

In order to be entered into the contest:

  1. Post your story on the Educator Learning Network using the hashtag #WhyITeach; and
  2. Share your story on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram with the hashtag #WhyITeach and tag @KappaDeltaPi.

What is the Educator Learning Network?

We’re glad you asked! The ELN is our new online learning environment and social community. Learn more at https://eln.kdp.org, and post your story by clicking on “Take Me to the KDP Network” (the second blue button). You’ll be asked to log into your member account—or, if you’re not a member yet, you can create a free account!

How will winners be chosen?

While we anticipate wanting to re-tell each and every story, we are limited to just 5 that we select. Ultimately, we are looking for heart-warming, inspirational, and encouraging stories about the teaching profession.

If you have any questions, please contact Chris Beaman, Director of Advancement & Communications, by emailing chris@kdp.org or by calling 800-284-3167.

International Day of Education

As educators, we understand the value and power of education. We witness it each day—when our students have an “aha” moment, when they grin with pride after successfully completing a new task, when they graduate ready to pursue their dreams.

The role of education in changing lives and communities is now more important than ever.

A year ago, the United Nations ratified the new 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), including Quality Education as goal number 4. The 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report determined that it is only through achieving quality education for all that the other 16 SDGs will be achieved.

In other words, the path to a just, peaceful, thriving planet is dependent on providing a quality education for everyone.

Unfortunately, millions of people around the globe do not have access to a quality education. As we remain steadfastly committed to Kappa Delta Pi’s goal of equity and a quality education for all, we work to serve members around the globe through campaigns like Change for Children, Books for Nigeria, and most recently, Backpacks of Hope.

We also support educators with quality resources and training though professional development courses on our new Educator Learning Network.

The power and impact of our community of committed educators continues to make a difference in the lives of students every day. In October, we will come together to recognize our role and grow as professionals at our international Convocation, focusing on the Power of You, the educator. For any educator who is interested in joining us, proposals are now being accepted on our website at http://www.kdp.org/convo2019.

As an NGO of the United Nations for 9 years, we invite you to join us in celebrating International Day of Education on January 24.

Because you are leaders of teaching and learning, this day celebrates you! On this day and every day, we need to remember that as education professionals, the people and creatures of the world are relying on us to make the world a better place. There is no other profession that has this role, privilege, and responsibility.

I leave you with a challenge. Share with the world your philosophy of education using the Showcase section of your FREE e-portfolio through our Educator Learning Network. Upload your philosophy to your e-portfolio and use the hashtag #EdPhilosophyChallenge on social media to share your philosophy with the world and others who are passionate about education. By doing so, you’re helping to raise awareness of the importance of education in our global society. (To create your e-portfolio, log into your KDP member profile and click on ‘My ePortfolio’ under the ‘My Account’ menu.)

Thank you for ALL that you do to make the world a better place through your chosen profession.

Faye Snodgress is the Executive Director of KDP.

Fighting back from the Global South: Education reform, teacher’s rights, and social media resistance in Mexico

Today’s blogger is David Ramírez Plascencia, a professor and researcher at the University of Guadalajara–SUV, whose recently published article “Education Reform, Teacher Resistance, and Social Media Activism in Mexico, 2013–2016” appears in the special issue of The Educational Forum on educator activism in politically polarized times. In that article, he relates how Mexican teachers use information technologies to engage in the fight against new regulations that affect their labor rights.

In recent decades, education systems in developed and poor countries have been impacted by neoliberalism tendencies that emphasis cost-benefit factors to the detriment of social access and equity. Public education in Mexico has not been an exception. In 2012, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto ordered the establishment of an educational reform. Teachers unions claimed the reform’s lack of legitimacy because they were never consulted; and since 2013, there have been several offline and online protests.

In general terms, most of the dissatisfaction concerning this reform centers on the fact that it tends to blame teachers for Mexico’s low-quality levels of education and standing among countries internationally. In addition, the amendment fails to offer appropriate instruments to improve education quality and applies a standard evaluation system that puts teachers under the microscope without consideration of important economic, administrative, infrastructural, and cultural differences among local education systems.

In this work, I focus not only on describing social media activism in education, both pro- and anti-reform, but I also consider how these virtual spaces have strengthened as an alternative media for teachers to fight back against governmental policies.

Meme example. An indigenous lady with a kerchief and the phrase in Spanish “We all are Oaxaca.” This slogan supports teachers’ actions in that state. This visual element is used frequently online to protest Mexico’s education reform.

My article stands mainly on two concepts. The first is “digital discourse,” which encompasses all sequences of interconnected ideas that span across digital media—audio, video, or even “meme” (see illustration). All these media consolidate to create dissidence with which to combat government actions. In other words, they are “weapons of the weak,” which is the second concept, referring to a particular form of resistance in which the oppressed use alternative and hidden strategies, aside from military hostility, to confront authority (J. C. Scott, 1987). What is remarkable in this context is how Mexican teachers use a dissident strategy of diverse multimedia elements as weapons against the educational reform.

In the end, the purpose of my contribution to this issue of The Educational Forum is to emphasize how cases like the teachers unions’ use of social media to support protests in Mexico provide substantial examples that might be replicated. This kind of media encourages movements and communities to have a voice to advocate for their demands, in spite of the government-controlled traditional media like the press or television. However, what is important to recall is that in order to improve education in Mexico, it is important to promote social assets like equality and justice, not only inside the government, and to modernize teachers’ unions as well, to open elections to a clear and democratic process, and to set strong transparent policies regarding usage of members’ dues. We must remember that providing quality education is a challenging task that can be addressed only with the collaborative efforts of all.

I hope you enjoy reading about this issue!

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from the special issue of The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through July 31, 2018.

5 Ways to Provide Meaningful Experiences in the Classroom

Providing effective instruction is the key to supporting a student’s education. An important component of such instruction is the facilitation of engaging activities that will promote questioning and diverse conversations around subjects that are relatable to your students. The United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #4, which encourages quality education for all, promotes innovation and creativity. This goal can be advanced through your classrooms in five ways.

1. Collaboration

Organize collaborations amongst teachers and students on a weekly basis to foster a positive school environment. Grade team teachers can plan periods that are centered around whole group and small group instruction across the grade level. For example, dedicate a social studies period to joining three classes together for small group projects.

2. Peer-to-Peer Intervisitations

Following the path of collaboration, create differentiation of instruction through peer-to-peer intervisitations. The purpose of having students from one class visit students in another would be to pair students who have similar interests or strengths together and challenge them to develop their critical thinking skills. Guided reading groups would be a great channel for this because they can move at their own pace and be challenged through essential questions and inferring techniques.

3. Authentic Conversations

Commit to the SDG #4, quality education, by developing real connections to the students you teach and invest in. Individual conferences are valuable because the teacher becomes the learner. Students can teach the teacher about their culture through the labels that they add in their writing, their word choice, and the narratives that they share through the process of storytelling.

4. Professional Development

Work with other teachers during professional development to try out a new protocol that you are interested in using in your classroom or school. Fellow teachers can assist you in trying out a protocol prior to introducing it to your students. By sharing your ideas with colleagues, you can demonstrate your ideas and receive insightful feedback to make it better before presenting it to your students.

5. Social Media!

AAs members of Kappa Delta Pi, an organization that prides itself in promoting educational resources and successes, feel free to share your classroom activities on social media and celebrate your progress on meeting educational goals. This would support the SDGs, particularly within quality education, by sharing successful teaching experiences with educators across the world. If you are doing amazing work in the field of education, please share it with the UN using the twitter handle @GlobalGoalsUN and the hashtag #GlobalGoals. Have you found ways to reach out to friends, family, or colleagues about the success you have had with projects surrounding education? Please share below!

Happy Teaching,
Clairetza Felix

Clairetza Felix is a graduate student in the Literacy Specialist program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She chose to become a UN Youth Representative to be able to offer a unique approach to education.

2017 #KDPgrad with Pride Photo Contest – Now Open!

KDPgrad

Are you a senior or grad student who is graduating this spring or graduated in December?

First of all, congratulations! We are proud of you and wish you the very best as you job search and start your teaching career.

We know you must be proud of yourself and your achievements, too—and took (or will take) photos of yourself in your cap and gown with your KDP cords, stole, and/or medallion.

Share one or two of your favorite pictures of yourself on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #KDPGrad as a first step to entering our annual KDP Graduate with Pride photo contest.

To complete your entry, go to http://www.kdp.org/gradwithpridecontest.php to answer a quick survey so we know who you are and a couple of sentences about your journey to become a teacher.

All completed entries will be entered into a drawing to win 1 of 5 $20 gift certificates to the KDP Store.

Pictures will be placed in an album on KDP’s Facebook page. One way to win is to share the photo(s) from our page and/or ask your friends and family members to “like” your photo for a chance to win the most “likes.”

Eligible participants are members who graduated in December 2016 or are graduating this spring semester. The contest deadline is June 16, after which winners will be selected.

Good luck! We’ll be looking for your picture soon!

2016 Winners of the #KDPGrad Photo Contest

“Students must be taught how to think, not what to think” Wallpaper Now Available!

If you follow Kappa Delta Pi on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, you might notice that we post a dose of inspiration for you each Monday morning to help kick start your week. This #MondayMorningInspiration is one of our most popular social media features.

We thought that you might want to keep these wise words front and center all month long, so we took August’s most popular #MondayMorningInspiration (based on likes and shares) and turned it into a downloadable wallpaper for all of your tech devices.

You can download August’s inspiration for computer, mobile device, or tablet (respectively) by clicking on the gallery below, viewing the wallpaper of your choice in full size, and saving it to your device. We hope this inspiration warms your heart every time you see it.

Chris Beaman is the Manager of Marketing & Communications at Kappa Delta Pi Headquarters.


Computer

Computer

Mobile

Mobile

Tablet

Tablet

Celebrate Founders Day—Snap a Photo!

Laura Stelsel is director of marketing & communications at Kappa Delta Pi.

Founders cake

Serving a sweet cake at your celebration? Share it with us!

Kappa Delta Pi will be 104 years old on March 8. How do you plan to celebrate? Whether you wear your KDP pin or have a chapter celebration (you can find resources to plan your celebration on the KDP website), we hope you’ll do something to commemorate our founding AND we hope you take a moment to snap a photo.

Why? Because it’s time for our first Founders Day photo contest! Eligible participants include any paid, current member of the Society OR a chapter of paid, current members of the Society. Winners cannot have a lapsed membership status.

Founders photo

Honor our founders–recreate a photo of the first initiates!

The contest runs through noon on March 13, after which a winner (and prizes) will be selected by KDP staff and announced via social media.

Here’s how you can enter the contest:

  • Post photos to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram using the hashtag #KDPFounders AND/OR
  • Email photos to marketing@kdp.org
  • Include a few sentences about the photos
  • Watch for the winner announcement on March 14
Katie with archives

Have a piece of our history in your chapter archives? Bring it out for Founders Day! And snap a photo, of course.

In the meantime, check out all of the submissions in our Facebook album. Good luck!

By submitting a photo, you grant Kappa Delta Pi permission to use your likeness, and the likeness of the other parties, in a photograph in any and all of its publications, including website entries, without payment or any other consideration.