What do you want to be when you grow up?

Dr. Yvonne Skipper

Today’s blogger is Yvonne Skipper, who co-authored with Eloise de Carvalho to write “’I Have Seen the Opportunities That Science Brings’: Encouraging Girls to Persist in Science,” which appears in the latest issue of The Educational Forum.

This time-honored question, which children across the globe are asked with regularity, can lead to surprising responses.

Beyond the whimsical “princess” and “unicorn” to the heart-warming “happy,” children often have strong ideas even before they reach school.

However, as children get older and learn more about the world, these ideas can change.

For example, we cannot all become a real princess like Megan Markle! Sometimes these views change, not because of how children see the world, but because of how the world sees them. Society may openly or subtly suggest that certain jobs are for men and others for women.

This view can impact the subjects and careers children choose, as illustrated in this brief video.

There is currently a huge demand for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) graduates in the workforce. Those with a STEM background are valued not just in the science-based jobs, but also in other roles where the ability to think critically, analyze data, and evaluate evidence is prized.

However, often children are not interested in STEM subjects, seeing them as “too hard” or “boring,” and they are even less interested in scientific careers. When you look at those who do continue in science, typically you find more boys in STEM subjects, such as math and physics, and in pursuit of careers such as engineering. This difference is not seen because girls lack talent in these subjects. In fact, girls often perform better than boys, receiving higher proportions of the top grades. So why are these talented girls less likely to continue in STEM than boys?

It has been suggested that we choose our subjects and our careers based on whether we think we can succeed and our values.

Boys are more likely than girls to believe they can succeed in STEM, even though they are overall less likely to get the highest grades. Their belief might come from seeing so many famous male scientists, both in academia and in fiction. This can lead boys and girls to believe that men are more likely to succeed and also more likely to “belong” in science. Even the television show Big Bang Theory focuses more on male scientists; female scientists Amy and Bernadette do not appear until later seasons and are working in the more “female” fields of medicine and neurobiology. It is important that the media fully represent female scientists in their factual and fiction programming.

We also choose subjects and careers that we think we will enjoy and that we see as useful in our lives or in our communities.

Many girls choose careers where they can help others, such as teaching, midwifery, and social work. Girls often do not perceive STEM careers as “helpful.” This is interesting because, for example, designing a new wheelchair to manage rough terrain, creating inclusive educational technologies, and researching cures for diseases could have a positive impact and help people worldwide. Yet often girls do not make the connection between STEM subjects and the impact of associated careers, and may prefer a more interpersonal approach to helping.

Promoting how “helpful” science can be could potentially lead girls to develop an understanding about how science improves society.

In our Forum article, Eloise and I are not saying that girls should be pushed into science careers, but instead that women should not leave a subject or career path for the “wrong” reason, such as believing that they are less likely to succeed than others or that they will not belong. Instead it is important that we feel able to choose our subjects and career paths in line with our interests and goals for ourselves and our communities.

KDP is proud to partner with Routledge to share an essay from The Educational Forum with the education community. Access the article at Taylor and Francis Online, free through June 30, 2019.

Host an Hour of Code Event in Six Steps

Dr. Megan Nickels

Drs. Megan Nickels and Laurie O. Campbell are Assistant Professors of STEM Education in the College of Education and Human Performance at the University of Central Florida.

The push to expose today’s students to computer science activities has quickly become a global priority, with high visibility events, such as the Hour of Code (this year: December 3–9, 2018), reaching nearly 400 million students since its 2013 launch.

Dr. Laurie Campbell

In addition to the many responsibilities you face as a new teacher, you are now expected to facilitate a subject for which you may have had little experience. Very likely, you may wonder: How can I plan to successfully implement computer science activities in my classroom?

The easiest entry into teaching computer science is to host an Hour of Code event. The Hour of Code is an annual event held each December during Computer Science Education Week that invites students of all ages to learn the basics of computer science through highly engaging tutorials on an array of themes such as Angry Birds, Star Wars, and Disney’s Moana. During the one-hour event, your students will use computers, tablets, or other devices to complete the tutorials using Blockly, the drag-and-drop programming language (see Figure 1).

Figure 1.

Getting Started

Begin planning for your Hour of Code event by trying a tutorial yourself. Visit the Disney-sponsored Hour of Code to try a tutorial. Once you have the opportunity to try one or more tutorials, you can decide which tutorial will best motivate and engage students during your event. With your chosen tutorial in mind, follow these steps to ensure a successful Hour of Code event.

  1. Plan the learning configuration that will meet the needs of your students.

*Tip- Groups of 2–3 work well for young children in grades K–5. Older students are more successful with 1–1 technology.

  1. Decide what devices your students will use and make arrangements to have them available during your event.
  2. Schedule a specific time for your event and let students know that they are part of a global initiative to learn how to code their world.
  3. Garner excitement by introducing famous coders like supermodel, Karlie Kloss, or NBA basketball player Chris Bosh through Hour of Code videos.
  4. Finally, give the students an opportunity to discover drag-and-drop coding at your first Hour of Code event!
  5. Once the students have completed the tutorial, debrief with them about their experience and introduce them to more advanced coding tutorials at code.org or other websites such as Scratch and Code Avengers.

General Tips

  • Provide children with information or explanation about the programming blocks or procedures specific to the task. Use phrases such as You can expect … You will see …
  • Provide an advanced organizer for students who may have trouble remembering or sequencing programming blocks.
  • Provide strategy cues for the end of tutorial challenges.

Resource

Nickels, M. (2016, June 27). How do we prepare teachers to teach coding? Retrieved from http://gettingsmart.com/2016/06/prepare-teachers-teach-coding/

 

 

A Job—The Ultimate Goal

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Students had to successfully construct a roller coaster, test the marble to have 10 consecutive successful runs without falling off of the track, and either land that marble in a cup at the end or knock it over. It was a great STEM lab.

“Beginning student teaching is going to be a scary experience.”

…at least that’s what I told my fellow cohort members/friends at Rowan University back at the start of Clinical Internship I in 2014. We are all trying to reach the same goal and once that is realized, it helps put things into perspective. It’s always great to remember that you have fellow students, teachers, professors, and family to help you through anything that life throws at you. Relying on their inputs really helped me get through the biggest transition period in my life.

The hardest part of student teaching for me was showing the students I had confidence in what I was teaching. From day one, students read your vibes and if you are not fully committed, they will know! On the other hand, if you are passionate and enthusiastic in what you are teaching, the students will, in a sense, fall in love with your teaching style. I was not really an expert when teaching language arts, but as long as I was confident in what I was teaching and was prepared, I knew I was going to be successful. Being passionate and motivating students is an eye opening experience and like my sister Tracy (a teacher) told me once, “The word of an admired teacher carries more weight than anyone realizes.”

In Rowan University’s Master of Science Teaching program, we student taught for two semesters. Organization with college classes, lesson plans, and hands-on experiments were all very time consuming. Some days I did not leave the school until 7 pm because I was trying to prepare for the next day. The more I felt I was organizedIMG_0134, the easier it was to teach the following day. Do not wait to start becoming organized until you take over the entire classroom; start on Day One. Trust me, it will make your life a lot easier!

Even though student teaching brings a vast number of surprises throughout the course of the one- or two-semester-long internship, one surprise was the way other teachers treated me. I was accepted into the building by the staff at Folsom Elementary and never looked back. As long as you carry yourself professionally, you will be respected. Everyone that has become a teacher has gone through student teaching, and they know how hard it is, so always say hello to everyone in the halls and offer assistance to anyone that may need it. If you can get along with everyone at the school you are student teaching in, then you can go anywhere and be a successful teacher. This is just a stepping stone and you never know when you may be offered a job! That is the ultimate goal.

Lastly, there isIMG_0103 one thing that I wish I known before going into student teaching and that was to take it one day at a time. From completing my action research, to edTPA, to trying to make 6 different lesson plans per day (I was in elementary education), it really got overwhelming at times. Some days I would feel that there was too much to do and that I did not have enough time to complete all the jobs I needed to complete. Looking back, I wish I could say to myself to take it one day at a time and everything will work itself out. As long as you stay organized, act professionally, and show enjoyment in what you are doing, you will be just fine. Good luck!

Rick HegganHeggan 2 is a recent graduate from Rowan University’s Master of Science, Teaching program where his concentration was in Elementary Education. He also received his middle school endorsement in Science during this time. Currently, Rick is teaching 6th and 8th grade Science at the Neeta School in Medford Lakes, New Jersey. Prior to this, Rick worked at the Hammonton Middle School as a paraprofessional aide for almost two (2) years. His professional experience includes working at Adams, Rehmann and Heggan (surveying and engineering corporation) for eight (8) years. He recently was awarded KDP/ATE Student Teacher of the Year for 2015.